RUINS in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - ruins in Great Expectations
1  With all that ruin at my feet and about me, it seemed a natural place for me, that day.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLIV
2  We walked round the ruined garden twice or thrice more, and it was all in bloom for me.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXIX
3  It was with a depressed heart that I walked in the starlight for an hour and more, about the courtyard, and about the brewery, and about the ruined garden.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXVIII
4  The cleared space had been enclosed with a rough fence, and looking over it, I saw that some of the old ivy had struck root anew, and was growing green on low quiet mounds of ruin.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter LIX
5  The nooks of ruin where the old monks had once had their refectories and gardens, and where the strong walls were now pressed into the service of humble sheds and stables, were almost as silent as the old monks in their graves.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLIX
6  By the wilderness of casks that I had walked on long ago, and on which the rain of years had fallen since, rotting them in many places, and leaving miniature swamps and pools of water upon those that stood on end, I made my way to the ruined garden.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLIX
7  I took her hand in mine, and we went out of the ruined place; and, as the morning mists had risen long ago when I first left the forge, so the evening mists were rising now, and in all the broad expanse of tranquil light they showed to me, I saw no shadow of another parting from her.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter LIX
8  It opened to the ground, and looked into a most miserable corner of the neglected garden, upon a rank ruin of cabbage-stalks, and one box-tree that had been clipped round long ago, like a pudding, and had a new growth at the top of it, out of shape and of a different color, as if that part of the pudding had stuck to the saucepan and got burnt.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XI