SCHOOL in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - school in Great Expectations
1  I have never been unfaithful to you or your schooling.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXVIII
2  I am going to try to get the place of mistress in the new school nearly finished here.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXV
3  I had received strict orders from my sister to call for him at the Three Jolly Bargemen, that evening, on my way from school, and bring him home at my peril.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter X
4  Startop had been spoilt by a weak mother and kept at home when he ought to have been at school, but he was devotedly attached to her, and admired her beyond measure.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXV
5  I recalled the hopeless circumstances by which she had been surrounded in the miserable little shop and the miserable little noisy evening school, with that miserable old bundle of incompetence always to be dragged and shouldered.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XVII
6  'Consequence, my mother and me we ran away from my father several times; and then my mother she'd go out to work, and she'd say, "Joe," she'd say, "now, please God, you shall have some schooling, child," and she'd put me to school.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VII
7  'Consequence, my mother and me we ran away from my father several times; and then my mother she'd go out to work, and she'd say, "Joe," she'd say, "now, please God, you shall have some schooling, child," and she'd put me to school.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VII
8  Mr. Wopsle's great-aunt kept an evening school in the village; that is to say, she was a ridiculous old woman of limited means and unlimited infirmity, who used to go to sleep from six to seven every evening, in the society of youth who paid two pence per week each, for the improving opportunity of seeing her do it.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VII