SEA in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - sea in Great Expectations
1  That these likenesses had grown more numerous, as he, coming over the sea, had drawn nearer.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXIX
2  Ours was the marsh country, down by the river, within, as the river wound, twenty miles of the sea.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter I
3  Moving the lamp as the man moved, I made out that he was substantially dressed, but roughly, like a voyager by sea.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXIX
4  We lived at the top of the last house, and the wind rushing up the river shook the house that night, like discharges of cannon, or breakings of a sea.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXIX
5  The cold wind seemed to blow colder there than outside the gate; and it made a shrill noise in howling in and out at the open sides of the brewery, like the noise of wind in the rigging of a ship at sea.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
6  Whenever I watched the vessels standing out to sea with their white sails spread, I somehow thought of Miss Havisham and Estella; and whenever the light struck aslant, afar off, upon a cloud or sail or green hillside or water-line, it was just the same.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XV
7  To be sure, it was a deserted place, down to the pigeon-house in the brewery-yard, which had been blown crooked on its pole by some high wind, and would have made the pigeons think themselves at sea, if there had been any pigeons there to be rocked by it.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
8  I turned my head aside, for, with a rush and a sweep, like the old marsh winds coming up from the sea, a feeling like that which had subdued me on the morning when I left the forge, when the mists were solemnly rising, and when I laid my hand upon the village finger-post, smote upon my heart again.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXX
9  I remember that at a later period of my "time," I used to stand about the churchyard on Sunday evenings when night was falling, comparing my own perspective with the windy marsh view, and making out some likeness between them by thinking how flat and low both were, and how on both there came an unknown way and a dark mist and then the sea.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIV