SHE in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
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 Current Search - she in Frankenstein
1  She devoted herself to those whom she had been taught to call her uncle and cousins.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 3
2  They penetrate into the recesses of nature and show how she works in her hiding-places.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 3
3  Elizabeth had caught the scarlet fever; her illness was severe, and she was in the greatest danger.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 3
4  My children," she said, "my firmest hopes of future happiness were placed on the prospect of your union.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 3
5  Never was she so enchanting as at this time, when she recalled the sunshine of her smiles and spent them upon us.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 3
6  Her health, and even the tranquillity of her hitherto constant spirit, had been shaken by what she had gone through.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 1
7  This last blow overcame her, and she knelt by Beaufort's coffin weeping bitterly, when my father entered the chamber.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 1
8  She procured plain work; she plaited straw and by various means contrived to earn a pittance scarcely sufficient to support life.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 1
9  Although her disposition was gay and in many respects inconsiderate, yet she paid the greatest attention to every gesture of my aunt.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 6
10  My aunt conceived a great attachment for her, by which she was induced to give her an education superior to that which she had at first intended.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 6
11  She thought her the model of all excellence and endeavoured to imitate her phraseology and manners, so that even now she often reminds me of her.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 6
12  She had at first yielded to our entreaties, but when she heard that the life of her favourite was menaced, she could no longer control her anxiety.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 3
13  His daughter attended him with the greatest tenderness, but she saw with despair that their little fund was rapidly decreasing and that there was no other prospect of support.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 1
14  She was the living spirit of love to soften and attract; I might have become sullen in my study, rought through the ardour of my nature, but that she was there to subdue me to a semblance of her own gentleness.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 2
15  This benefit was fully repaid; Justine was the most grateful little creature in the world: I do not mean that she made any professions I never heard one pass her lips, but you could see by her eyes that she almost adored her protectress.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 6
16  He saw his mistress once before the destined ceremony; but she was bathed in tears, and throwing herself at his feet, entreated him to spare her, confessing at the same time that she loved another, but that he was poor, and that her father would never consent to the union.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Letter 2
17  There was a show of gratitude and worship in his attachment to my mother, differing wholly from the doting fondness of age, for it was inspired by reverence for her virtues and a desire to be the means of, in some degree, recompensing her for the sorrows she had endured, but which gave inexpressible grace to his behaviour to her.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 1
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