SINS in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde
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 Current Search - sins in The Picture of Dorian Gray
1  It is the world's original sin.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3
2  His sins, if there are such things as sins, are borrowed.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2
3  It was a marvellous spotted thing, as effective as the seven deadly sins.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 17
4  For every sin that he committed, a stain would fleck and wreck its fairness.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7
5  For all sins, as theologians weary not of reminding us, are sins of disobedience.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 16
6  The body sins once, and has done with its sin, for action is a mode of purification.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2
7  The body sins once, and has done with its sin, for action is a mode of purification.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2
8  There was a God who called upon men to tell their sins to earth as well as to heaven.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 20
9  What the worm was to the corpse, his sins would be to the painted image on the canvas.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 10
10  It is in the brain, and the brain only, that the great sins of the world take place also.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2
11  They flaunt their conjugal felicity in one's face, as if it were the most fascinating of sins.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 8
12  Not "Forgive us our sins" but "Smite us for our iniquities" should be the prayer of man to a most just God.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 20
13  You will soon be going about like the converted, and the revivalist, warning people against all the sins of which you have grown tired.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 19
14  It seemed to him that in exquisite raiment, and to the delicate sound of flutes, the sins of the world were passing in dumb show before him.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 10
15  There were opium dens where one could buy oblivion, dens of horror where the memory of old sins could be destroyed by the madness of sins that were new.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 16
16  All that it really demonstrated was that our future would be the same as our past, and that the sin we had done once, and with loathing, we would do many times, and with joy.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4
17  I felt that this grey monstrous London of ours, with its myriads of people, its sordid sinners, and its splendid sins, as you once phrased it, must have something in store for me.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4
18  Some love might come across his life, and purify him, and shield him from those sins that seemed to be already stirring in spirit and in flesh--those curious unpictured sins whose very mystery lent them their subtlety and their charm.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 10
19  There were sins whose fascination was more in the memory than in the doing of them, strange triumphs that gratified the pride more than the passions, and gave to the intellect a quickened sense of joy, greater than any joy they brought, or could ever bring, to the senses.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 14
20  He had uttered a mad wish that he himself might remain young, and the portrait grow old; that his own beauty might be untarnished, and the face on the canvas bear the burden of his passions and his sins; that the painted image might be seared with the lines of suffering and thought, and that he might keep all the delicate bloom and loveliness of his then just conscious boyhood.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7