SLEEP in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from The Aeneid by Virgil
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 Current Search - sleep in The Aeneid
1  Night fell, and sleep held all things living on the earth.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK THIRD
2  Thus spoke the River, and sank in the depth of the pool: night and sleep left Aeneas.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK EIGHTH
3  Now Aeneas was fixed to go, and now, with all set duly in order, was taking hasty sleep on his high stern.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK FOURTH
4  Their lights glimmer far apart; buried in drunken sleep they have sunk to rest; silence stretches all about.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK NINTH
5  For in sleep the phantom of Cassandra the soothsayer seemed to give me blazing brands: Here seek your Troy, she said; here is your home.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK FIFTH
6  Sunk in sleep and wine, the Rutulians are silent; we have stealthily spied the open ground that lies in the path through the gate next the sea.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK NINTH
7  They sweep down the city buried in drunken sleep; the watchmen are cut down, and at the open gates they welcome all their comrades, and unite their confederate bands.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK SECOND
8  Thrice there did he essay to fling his arms about his neck; thrice the phantom vainly grasped fled out of his hands even as light wind, and most like to fluttering sleep.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK SIXTH
9  Thrice there was I fain to lay mine arms round her neck; thrice the vision I vainly clasped fled out of my hands, even as the light breezes, or most like to fluttering sleep.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK SECOND
10  He breaks from sleep in overpowering fear, his limbs and body bathed in sweat that breaks out all over him; he shrieks madly for arms, searches for arms on his bed and in his palace.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK SEVENTH
11  Not far away he knows the snowy canvas of Rhesus' tents, which, betrayed in their first sleep, the blood-stained son of Tydeus laid desolate in heaped slaughter, and turns the ruddy steeds away to the camp ere ever they tasted Trojan fodder or drunk of Xanthus.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK FIRST
12  Scarcely had sleep begun to slacken his limbs unaware, when bending down, he flung him sheer into the clear water, tearing rudder and half the stern away with him, and many a time crying vainly on his comrades: himself he rose on flying wings into the thin air.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK FIFTH
13  And even now for thine assurance, that thou think not this the idle fashioning of sleep, a great sow shall be found lying under the oaks on the shore, with her new-born litter of thirty head: white she couches on the ground, and the brood about her teats is white.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK EIGHTH
14  In my sleep, often as the dank shades of night veil the earth, often as the stars lift their fires, the troubled phantom of my father Anchises comes in warning and dread; my boy Ascanius, how I wrong one so dear in cheating him of an Hesperian kingdom and destined fields.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK FOURTH
15  Night fell, and over all lands weary creatures were fast in deep slumber, the race of fowl and of cattle; when lord Aeneas, sick at heart of the dismal warfare, stretched him on the river bank under the cope of the cold sky, and let sleep, though late, overspread his limbs.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK EIGHTH
16  And first he laces to his feet the shoes of gold that bear him high winging over seas or land as fleet as the gale; then takes the rod wherewith he calls wan souls forth of Orcus, or sends them again to the sad depth of hell, gives sleep and takes it away and unseals dead eyes; in whose strength he courses the winds and swims across the tossing clouds.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK FOURTH
17  I shake myself from sleep and mount over the sloping roof, and stand there with ears attent: even as when flame catches a corn-field while south winds are furious, or the racing torrent of a mountain stream sweeps the fields, sweeps the smiling crops and labours of the oxen, and hurls the forest with it headlong; the shepherd in witless amaze hears the roar from the cliff-top.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK SECOND
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