SLEEP in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
Free Online Vocabulary Test
K12, SAT, GRE, IELTS, TOEFL
 Search Panel
Word:
You may input your word or phrase.
Author:
Book:
 
Stems:
If search object is a contraction or phrase, it'll be ignored.
Sort by:
Each search starts from the first page. Its result is limited to the first 17 sentences. If you upgrade to a VIP account, you will see up to 500 sentences for one search.
Common Search Words
 Current Search - sleep in Great Expectations
1  He forged wills, this blade did, if he didn't also put the supposed testators to sleep too.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXIV
2  He had rolled a handkerchief round his head, and his face was set and lowering in his sleep.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXIX
3  His back was towards me, and he had his arms folded, and was nodding forward, heavy with sleep.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter III
4  It was the first time I had ever lain down to rest in Satis House, and sleep refused to come near me.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXVIII
5  It happened so to catch her fancy that she took it up in a low brooding voice as if she were singing in her sleep.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XII
6  I put my light out, and crept into bed; and it was an uneasy bed now, and I never slept the old sound sleep in it any more.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XVIII
7  I was afraid to sleep, even if I had been inclined, for I knew that at the first faint dawn of morning I must rob the pantry.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter II
8  As soon as this volume began to circulate, Mr. Wopsle's great-aunt fell into a state of coma, arising either from sleep or a rheumatic paroxysm.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter X
9  My only other remembrances of the great festival are, That they wouldn't let me go to sleep, but whenever they saw me dropping off, woke me up and told me to enjoy myself.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIII
10  He was very much pleased by my asking if I might sleep in my own little room, and I was pleased too; for I felt that I had done rather a great thing in making the request.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXV
11  But I had as sound a sleep in that lodging as in the most superior accommodation the Boar could have given me, and the quality of my dreams was about the same as in the best bedroom.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter LVIII
12  I coaxed myself to sleep by thinking of Miss Havisham's, next Wednesday; and in my sleep I saw the file coming at me out of a door, without seeing who held it, and I screamed myself awake.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter X
13  Biddy was astir so early to get my breakfast, that, although I did not sleep at the window an hour, I smelt the smoke of the kitchen fire when I started up with a terrible idea that it must be late in the afternoon.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIX
14  When I awoke without having parted in my sleep with the perception of my wretchedness, the clocks of the Eastward churches were striking five, the candles were wasted out, the fire was dead, and the wind and rain intensified the thick black darkness.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXIX
15  As there was full an hour and a half between me and daylight, I dozed again; now, waking up uneasily, with prolix conversations about nothing, in my ears; now, making thunder of the wind in the chimney; at length, falling off into a profound sleep from which the daylight woke me with a start.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XL
16  Mr. Wopsle's great-aunt kept an evening school in the village; that is to say, she was a ridiculous old woman of limited means and unlimited infirmity, who used to go to sleep from six to seven every evening, in the society of youth who paid two pence per week each, for the improving opportunity of seeing her do it.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VII