SMOKE in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Hard Times by Charles Dickens
Free Online Vocabulary Test
K12, SAT, GRE, IELTS, TOEFL
 Search Panel
Word:
You may input your word or phrase.
Author:
Book:
 
Stems:
If search object is a contraction or phrase, it'll be ignored.
Sort by:
Each search starts from the first page. Its result is limited to the first 17 sentences. If you upgrade to a VIP account, you will see up to 500 sentences for one search.
Common Search Words
 Current Search - smoke in Hard Times
1  First of all, you see our smoke.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER II
2  The distant smoke very black and heavy.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XV
3  Tom blew his smoke aside, after he had been smoking a little while, and took an observation of his friend.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER II
4  Tom blew his smoke aside, after he had been smoking a little while, and took an observation of his friend.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER II
5  The Fairy palaces burst into illumination, before pale morning showed the monstrous serpents of smoke trailing themselves over Coketown.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XI
6  It was a town of machinery and tall chimneys, out of which interminable serpents of smoke trailed themselves for ever and ever, and never got uncoiled.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V
7  Heedless of the smoke and mud and wet, and of her two long journeys, she was gazing at it, as if the heavy thrum that issued from its many stories were proud music to her.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XII
8  I know the bricks of this town, and I know the works of this town, and I know the chimneys of this town, and I know the smoke of this town, and I know the Hands of this town.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER III
9  Fire and steam, and smoke, and red light; a hiss, a crash, a bell, and a shriek; Louisa put into one carriage, Mrs. Sparsit put into another: the little station a desert speck in the thunderstorm.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER X
10  It was a town of red brick, or of brick that would have been red if the smoke and ashes had allowed it; but as matters stood, it was a town of unnatural red and black like the painted face of a savage.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V
11  But, less inexorable than iron, steel, and brass, it brought its varying seasons even into that wilderness of smoke and brick, and made the only stand that ever was made in the place against its direful uniformity.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XIV
12  The next morning was too bright a morning for sleep, and James Harthouse rose early, and sat in the pleasant bay window of his dressing-room, smoking the rare tobacco that had had so wholesome an influence on his young friend.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VII
13  Reposing in the sunlight, with the fragrance of his eastern pipe about him, and the dreamy smoke vanishing into the air, so rich and soft with summer odours, he reckoned up his advantages as an idle winner might count his gains.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VII
14  James Harthouse continued to lounge in the same place and attitude, smoking his cigar in his own easy way, and looking pleasantly at the whelp, as if he knew himself to be a kind of agreeable demon who had only to hover over him, and he must give up his whole soul if required.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER II
15  Feeling it necessary to do something then, he stretched himself out at greater length, and, reclining with the back of his head on the end of the sofa, and smoking with an infinite assumption of negligence, turned his common face, and not too sober eyes, towards the face looking down upon him so carelessly yet so potently.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER II
16  She sat at the window, when the sun began to sink behind the smoke; she sat there, when the smoke was burning red, when the colour faded from it, when darkness seemed to rise slowly out of the ground, and creep upward, upward, up to the house-tops, up the church steeple, up to the summits of the factory chimneys, up to the sky.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER I
17  They were ruined, when they were required to send labouring children to school; they were ruined when inspectors were appointed to look into their works; they were ruined, when such inspectors considered it doubtful whether they were quite justified in chopping people up with their machinery; they were utterly undone, when it was hinted that perhaps they need not always make quite so much smoke.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER I
Your search result possibly is over 17 sentences. If you upgrade to a VIP account, you will see up to 500 sentences for one search.