SNOW in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Dubliners by James Joyce
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 Current Search - snow in Dubliners
1  "I love the look of snow," said Aunt Julia sadly.
Dubliners By James Joyce
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2  Gabriel pointed to the statue, on which lay patches of snow.
Dubliners By James Joyce
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3  Yes, the newspapers were right: snow was general all over Ireland.
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4  In the distance lay the park where the trees were weighted with snow.
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5  "But poor Mr. D'Arcy doesn't like the snow," said Aunt Kate, smiling.
Dubliners By James Joyce
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6  The Wellington Monument wore a gleaming cap of snow that flashed westward over the white field of Fifteen Acres.
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7  People, perhaps, were standing in the snow on the quay outside, gazing up at the lighted windows and listening to the waltz music.
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8  It was slushy underfoot; and only streaks and patches of snow lay on the roofs, on the parapets of the quay and on the area railings.
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9  His soul swooned slowly as he heard the snow falling faintly through the universe and faintly falling, like the descent of their last end, upon all the living and the dead.
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10  A light fringe of snow lay like a cape on the shoulders of his overcoat and like toecaps on the toes of his goloshes; and, as the buttons of his overcoat slipped with a squeaking noise through the snow-stiffened frieze, a cold, fragrant air from out-of-doors escaped from crevices and folds.
Dubliners By James Joyce
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