SNOW in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from A Farewell to Arms by Ernest Hemingway
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 Current Search - snow in A Farewell to Arms
1  There's more snow there than here.
A Farewell to Arms By Ernest Hemingway
Context   In BOOK 1: 2
2  That fall the snow came very late.
A Farewell to Arms By Ernest Hemingway
Context   In BOOK 5: 38
3  Some one came in and as the door opened I could see the snow falling.
A Farewell to Arms By Ernest Hemingway
Context   In BOOK 1: 2
4  "There will be no more offensive now that the snow has come," I said.
A Farewell to Arms By Ernest Hemingway
Context   In BOOK 1: 2
5  When daylight came the storm was still blowing but the snow had stopped.
A Farewell to Arms By Ernest Hemingway
Context   In BOOK 3: 27
6  We stayed in bed with the fire roaring in the stove and watched the snow fall.
A Farewell to Arms By Ernest Hemingway
Context   In BOOK 5: 38
7  There was snow on the tops of the mountains and the lake was a gray steel-blue.
A Farewell to Arms By Ernest Hemingway
Context   In BOOK 5: 38
8  But I knew from the papers that they were still fighting in the mountains because the snow would not come.
A Farewell to Arms By Ernest Hemingway
Context   In BOOK 5: 38
9  We were in the foothills on the near side of the river and as the road mounted there were the high mountains off to the north with snow still on the tops.
A Farewell to Arms By Ernest Hemingway
Context   In BOOK 1: 8
10  He used a local anaesthetic called something or other "snow," which froze the tissue and avoided pain until the probe, the scalpel or the forceps got below the frozen portion.
A Farewell to Arms By Ernest Hemingway
Context   In BOOK 2: 15
11  We filled two cars with stretcher cases as they came up from the cellar of the post and as I shut the door of the second car and fastened it I felt the rain on my face turn to snow.
A Farewell to Arms By Ernest Hemingway
Context   In BOOK 3: 27
12  It came very fast and the sun went a dull yellow and then everything was gray and the sky was covered and the cloud came on down the mountain and suddenly we were in it and it was snow.
A Farewell to Arms By Ernest Hemingway
Context   In BOOK 1: 2
13  The snow slanted across the wind, the bare ground was covered, the stumps of trees projected, there was snow on the guns and there were paths in the snow going back to the latrines behind trenches.
A Farewell to Arms By Ernest Hemingway
Context   In BOOK 1: 2
14  The rain stopped and the wind drove the clouds so that the moon shone through and looking back I could see the long dark point of Castagnola and the lake with white-caps and beyond, the moon on the high snow mountains.
A Farewell to Arms By Ernest Hemingway
Context   In BOOK 4: 37
15  I had gone to no place where the roads were frozen and hard as iron, where it was clear cold and dry and the snow was dry and powdery and hare-tracks in the snow and the peasants took off their hats and called you Lord and there was good hunting.
A Farewell to Arms By Ernest Hemingway
Context   In BOOK 1: 3
16  Then, as the road mounted along the ridge, I saw a third range of mountains, higher snow mountains, that looked chalky white and furrowed, with strange planes, and then there were mountains far off beyond all these that you could hardly tell if you really saw.
A Farewell to Arms By Ernest Hemingway
Context   In BOOK 1: 8
17  Later, below in the town, I watched the snow falling, looking out of the window of the bawdy house, the house for officers, where I sat with a friend and two glasses drinking a bottle of Asti, and, looking out at the snow falling slowly and heavily, we knew it was all over for that year.
A Farewell to Arms By Ernest Hemingway
Context   In BOOK 1: 2
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