SNOW in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte
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 Current Search - snow in Wuthering Heights
1  The snow began to drive thickly.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER II
2  In the evening the weather broke: the wind shifted from south to north-east, and brought rain first, and then sleet and snow.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVII
3  His hair and clothes were whitened with snow, and his sharp cannibal teeth, revealed by cold and wrath, gleamed through the dark.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVII
4  A sorrowful sight I saw: dark night coming down prematurely, and sky and hills mingled in one bitter whirl of wind and suffocating snow.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER II
5  The moon shone bright; a sprinkling of snow covered the ground, and I reflected that she might, possibly, have taken it into her head to walk about the garden, for refreshment.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXIV
6  The distance from the gate to the grange is two miles; I believe I managed to make it four, what with losing myself among the trees, and sinking up to the neck in snow: a predicament which only those who have experienced it can appreciate.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER III
7  She certainly seemed in no laughing predicament: her hair streamed on her shoulders, dripping with snow and water; she was dressed in the girlish dress she commonly wore, befitting her age more than her position: a low frock with short sleeves, and nothing on either head or neck.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVII
8  This time, I remembered I was lying in the oak closet, and I heard distinctly the gusty wind, and the driving of the snow; I heard, also, the fir bough repeat its teasing sound, and ascribed it to the right cause: but it annoyed me so much, that I resolved to silence it, if possible; and, I thought, I rose and endeavoured to unhasp the casement.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER III