SOCIETY in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
Free Online Vocabulary Test
K12, SAT, GRE, IELTS, TOEFL
 Search Panel
Word:
You may input your word or phrase.
Author:
Book:
 
Stems:
If search object is a contraction or phrase, it'll be ignored.
Sort by:
Each search starts from the first page. Its result is limited to the first 17 sentences. If you upgrade to a VIP account, you will see up to 500 sentences for one search.
Common Search Words
 Current Search - society in Great Expectations
1  I wanted to make Joe less ignorant and common, that he might be worthier of my society and less open to Estella's reproach.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XV
2  Mr. Pumblechook and Mr. Hubble declined, on the plea of a pipe and ladies' society; but Mr. Wopsle said he would go, if Joe would.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter V
3  Gradually there arose before me the hat, head, neckcloth, waistcoat, trousers, boots, of a member of society of about my own standing.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXI
4  But here I anticipate a little, for I was not a Finch, and could not be, according to the sacred laws of the society, until I came of age.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXIV
5  I soon fell asleep before Wemmick's fire, and the Aged and I enjoyed one another's society by falling asleep before it more or less all day.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLV
6  As the six evenings had dwindled away, to five, to four, to three, to two, I had become more and more appreciative of the society of Joe and Biddy.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIX
7  My sister was uncommonly lively on the present occasion, and indeed was generally more gracious in the society of Mrs. Hubble than in other company.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter IV
8  I never had one hour's happiness in her society, and yet my mind all round the four-and-twenty hours was harping on the happiness of having her with me unto death.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXVIII
9  It was not with me then, as it was in later life, when I fell into the society of the Passions, and compared them with Collins and Wopsle, rather to the disadvantage of both gentlemen.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VII
10  I alluded to the advantages I had derived in my first rawness and ignorance from his society, and I confessed that I feared I had but ill repaid them, and that he might have done better without me and my expectations.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXVII
11  But in a fatal moment, yielding to those propensities and passions, the indulgence of which had so long rendered him a scourge to society, he had quitted his haven of rest and repentance, and had come back to the country where he was proscribed.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter LVI
12  I wrote, however, to Mr. Trabb by next day's post, to say that Mr. Pip must decline to deal further with one who could so far forget what he owed to the best interests of society, as to employ a boy who excited Loathing in every respectable mind.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXX
13  When these points were settled, and so far carried out as that I had begun to work in earnest, it occurred to me that if I could retain my bedroom in Barnard's Inn, my life would be agreeably varied, while my manners would be none the worse for Herbert's society.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXIV
14  Mr. Wopsle's great-aunt kept an evening school in the village; that is to say, she was a ridiculous old woman of limited means and unlimited infirmity, who used to go to sleep from six to seven every evening, in the society of youth who paid two pence per week each, for the improving opportunity of seeing her do it.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VII
15  On a certain occasion when the Finches were assembled in force, and when good feeling was being promoted in the usual manner by nobody's agreeing with anybody else, the presiding Finch called the Grove to order, forasmuch as Mr. Drummle had not yet toasted a lady; which, according to the solemn constitution of the society, it was the brute's turn to do that day.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXVIII