SOCIETY in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Nineteen Eighty-Four by George Orwell
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1  But in practice such a society could not long remain stable.
Nineteen Eighty-Four By George Orwell
Get Context   In PART 2: Chapter 9
2  In the long run, a hierarchical society was only possible on a basis of poverty and ignorance.
Nineteen Eighty-Four By George Orwell
Get Context   In PART 2: Chapter 9
3  But this would provide only the economic and not the emotional basis for a hierarchical society.
Nineteen Eighty-Four By George Orwell
Get Context   In PART 2: Chapter 9
4  In the past the need for a hierarchical form of society had been the doctrine specifically of the High.
Nineteen Eighty-Four By George Orwell
Get Context   In PART 2: Chapter 9
5  In more primitive ages, when a just and peaceful society was in fact not possible, it had been fairly easy to believe it.
Nineteen Eighty-Four By George Orwell
Get Context   In PART 2: Chapter 9
6  After the revolutionary period of the fifties and sixties, society regrouped itself, as always, into High, Middle, and Low.
Nineteen Eighty-Four By George Orwell
Get Context   In PART 2: Chapter 9
7  You did not have friends nowadays, you had comrades: but there were some comrades whose society was pleasanter than that of others.
Nineteen Eighty-Four By George Orwell
Get Context   In PART 1: Chapter 5
8  It eats up the surplus of consumable goods, and it helps to preserve the special mental atmosphere that a hierarchical society needs.
Nineteen Eighty-Four By George Orwell
Get Context   In PART 2: Chapter 9
9  But if they did not exist, the structure of world society, and the process by which it maintains itself, would not be essentially different.
Nineteen Eighty-Four By George Orwell
Get Context   In PART 2: Chapter 9
10  Later I shall send you a book from which you will learn the true nature of the society we live in, and the strategy by which we shall destroy it.
Nineteen Eighty-Four By George Orwell
Get Context   In PART 2: Chapter 8
11  Ever since the end of the nineteenth century, the problem of what to do with the surplus of consumption goods has been latent in industrial society.
Nineteen Eighty-Four By George Orwell
Get Context   In PART 2: Chapter 9
12  But it was also clear that an all-round increase in wealth threatened the destruction--indeed, in some sense was the destruction--of a hierarchical society.
Nineteen Eighty-Four By George Orwell
Get Context   In PART 2: Chapter 9
13  The effect was to convince the ruling groups of all countries that a few more atomic bombs would mean the end of organized society, and hence of their own power.
Nineteen Eighty-Four By George Orwell
Get Context   In PART 2: Chapter 9
14  The war is waged by each ruling group against its own subjects, and the object of the war is not to make or prevent conquests of territory, but to keep the structure of society intact.
Nineteen Eighty-Four By George Orwell
Get Context   In PART 2: Chapter 9
15  It was possible, no doubt, to imagine a society in which WEALTH, in the sense of personal possessions and luxuries, should be evenly distributed, while POWER remained in the hands of a small privileged caste.
Nineteen Eighty-Four By George Orwell
Get Context   In PART 2: Chapter 9
16  They have been subdivided in many ways, they have borne countless different names, and their relative numbers, as well as their attitude towards one another, have varied from age to age: but the essential structure of society has never altered.
Nineteen Eighty-Four By George Orwell
Get Context   In PART 2: Chapter 9
17  They have been subdivided in many ways, they have borne countless different names, and their relative numbers, as well as their attitude towards one another, have varied from age to age: but the essential structure of society has never altered.
Nineteen Eighty-Four By George Orwell
Get Context   In PART 2: Chapter 9
18  In the early twentieth century, the vision of a future society unbelievably rich, leisured, orderly, and efficient--a glittering antiseptic world of glass and steel and snow-white concrete--was part of the consciousness of nearly every literate person.
Nineteen Eighty-Four By George Orwell
Get Context   In PART 2: Chapter 9
19  This failed to happen, partly because of the impoverishment caused by a long series of wars and revolutions, partly because scientific and technical progress depended on the empirical habit of thought, which could not survive in a strictly regimented society.
Nineteen Eighty-Four By George Orwell
Get Context   In PART 2: Chapter 9
20  The aim of the Low, when they have an aim--for it is an abiding characteristic of the Low that they are too much crushed by drudgery to be more than intermittently conscious of anything outside their daily lives--is to abolish all distinctions and create a society in which all men shall be equal.
Nineteen Eighty-Four By George Orwell
Get Context   In PART 2: Chapter 9