SOCIETY in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde
 Search Panel
Word:
 You may input your word too.
Author:
Book:
 
Stems:
Sort by:
 Current Search - society in The Picture of Dorian Gray
1  In good society that always whitewashes a woman.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 8
2  England is bad enough I know, and English society is all wrong.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 12
3  Yet he was not really reckless, at any rate in his relations to society.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 11
4  For the canons of good society are, or should be, the same as the canons of art.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 11
5  When they met in society now, it was only Dorian Gray who smiled: Alan Campbell never did.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 14
6  You know we poor artists have to show ourselves in society from time to time, just to remind the public that we are not savages.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1
7  As for conversation, there are only five women in London worth talking to, and two of these can't be admitted into decent society.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4
8  The inherited stupidity of the race--sound English common sense he jovially termed it--was shown to be the proper bulwark for society.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 15
9  Society--civilized society, at least--is never very ready to believe anything to the detriment of those who are both rich and fascinating.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 11
10  The terror of society, which is the basis of morals, the terror of God, which is the secret of religion--these are the two things that govern us.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2
11  The middle classes air their moral prejudices over their gross dinner-tables, and whisper about what they call the profligacies of their betters in order to try and pretend that they are in smart society and on intimate terms with the people they slander.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 12
12  His extraordinary absences became notorious, and, when he used to reappear again in society, men would whisper to each other in corners, or pass him with a sneer, or look at him with cold searching eyes, as though they were determined to discover his secret.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 11