SOCIETY in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - society in Pride and Prejudice
1  I must have employment and society.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 16
2  If he wants our society, let him seek it.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 53
3  I thought too ill of him to invite him to Pemberley, or admit his society in town.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 35
4  In society so superior to what she had generally known, her improvement was great.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 61
5  Certainly, sir; and it has the advantage also of being in vogue amongst the less polished societies of the world.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 6
6  Mr. Collins, to be sure, was neither sensible nor agreeable; his society was irksome, and his attachment to her must be imaginary.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 22
7  Mr. Wickham's society was of material service in dispelling the gloom which the late perverse occurrences had thrown on many of the Longbourn family.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 24
8  It was next to impossible that their cousin should come in a scarlet coat, and it was now some weeks since they had received pleasure from the society of a man in any other colour.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 13
9  But really, ma'am, I think it would be very hard upon younger sisters, that they should not have their share of society and amusement, because the elder may not have the means or inclination to marry early.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 29
10  My father was not only fond of this young man's society, whose manners were always engaging; he had also the highest opinion of him, and hoping the church would be his profession, intended to provide for him in it.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 35
11  Mr. Wickham began to speak on more general topics, Meryton, the neighbourhood, the society, appearing highly pleased with all that he had yet seen, and speaking of the latter with gentle but very intelligible gallantry.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 16
12  She had always spoken to him as she would to any other gentleman; she made not the smallest objection to his joining in the society of the neighbourhood nor to his leaving the parish occasionally for a week or two, to visit his relations.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 14
13  From the further disadvantage of Lydia's society she was of course carefully kept, and though Mrs. Wickham frequently invited her to come and stay with her, with the promise of balls and young men, her father would never consent to her going.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 61
14  Jane pictured to herself a happy evening in the society of her two friends, and the attentions of her brother; and Elizabeth thought with pleasure of dancing a great deal with Mr. Wickham, and of seeing a confirmation of everything in Mr. Darcy's look and behaviour.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 17
15  Presuming however, that this studied avoidance spoke rather a momentary embarrassment than any dislike of the proposal, and seeing in her husband, who was fond of society, a perfect willingness to accept it, she ventured to engage for her attendance, and the day after the next was fixed on.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 44
16  We have certainly done our best; and most fortunately having it in our power to introduce you to very superior society, and, from our connection with Rosings, the frequent means of varying the humble home scene, I think we may flatter ourselves that your Hunsford visit cannot have been entirely irksome.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 38
17  The next was in these words: "I do not pretend to regret anything I shall leave in Hertfordshire, except your society, my dearest friend; but we will hope, at some future period, to enjoy many returns of that delightful intercourse we have known, and in the meanwhile may lessen the pain of separation by a very frequent and most unreserved correspondence."
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 21
18  Mr. Collins was not a sensible man, and the deficiency of nature had been but little assisted by education or society; the greatest part of his life having been spent under the guidance of an illiterate and miserly father; and though he belonged to one of the universities, he had merely kept the necessary terms, without forming at it any useful acquaintance.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 15
19  To these highflown expressions Elizabeth listened with all the insensibility of distrust; and though the suddenness of their removal surprised her, she saw nothing in it really to lament; it was not to be supposed that their absence from Netherfield would prevent Mr. Bingley's being there; and as to the loss of their society, she was persuaded that Jane must cease to regard it, in the enjoyment of his.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 21