SOMETHING in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Hard Times by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - something in Hard Times
1  He waited, as if he would have been glad that she said something.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XV
2  I have no further trust, than that I know something of her character and her marriage.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER I
3  I made that wild escape into something visionary, and have slowly found out how wild it was.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER X
4  I do not say that it is much, or that it is enough; but it is something, and it is necessary.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER I
5  Mr. Bounderby, who was always more or less like a Wind, finding something in his way here, began to blow at it directly.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER V
6  Going to the hearth to set the candle down upon a round three-legged table standing there, he stumbled against something.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER X
7  He had moved away a pace or two to come down from the platform, when he remembered something he had not said, and returned again.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER IV
8  Somehow or other, he had become possessed by an idea that there was something in this girl which could hardly be set forth in a tabular form.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XIV
9  His cold eyes would hardly have been eyes, but for the short ends of lashes which, by bringing them into immediate contrast with something paler than themselves, expressed their form.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER II
10  Not with the brightness natural to cheerful youth, but with uncertain, eager, doubtful flashes, which had something painful in them, analogous to the changes on a blind face groping its way.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER III
11  There was something so very agreeable in being so intimate with such a waistcoat; in being called Tom, in such an intimate way, by such a voice; in being on such off-hand terms so soon, with such a pair of whiskers; that Tom was uncommonly pleased with himself.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER II
12  The member of the fluffy classes was injured, exasperated, left the house grumbling, met somebody who proposed to him to go in for some share in this Bank business, went in, put something in his pocket which had nothing in it before, and relieved his mind extremely.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER X
13  What harmony, besides her age and her simplicity, surrounded her, he did not know, but even in this fantastic action there was a something neither out of time nor place: a something which it seemed as if nobody else could have made as serious, or done with such a natural and touching air.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XII
14  Feeling it necessary to do something then, he stretched himself out at greater length, and, reclining with the back of his head on the end of the sofa, and smoking with an infinite assumption of negligence, turned his common face, and not too sober eyes, towards the face looking down upon him so carelessly yet so potently.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER II
15  As this was his usual hour for having a little confidential chat with Mrs. Sparsit, and as he had already caught her eye and seen that she was going to ask him something, he made a pretence of arranging the rulers, inkstands, and so forth, while that lady went on with her tea, glancing through the open window, down into the street.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER I