SON in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Ivanhoe by Walter Scott
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 Current Search - son in Ivanhoe
1  "Higg, the son of Snell," answered the peasant.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXVII
2  Under this respectable emblem stood a cross, stated to be the mark of Gurth, the son of Beowulph.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXV
3  But Higg, the son of Snell, felt most deeply the effect produced by the sight of the countenance of his benefactress.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXVII
4  He could not bring himself to acknowledge, in presence of such an assembly, the son whom he had renounced and disinherited.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVIII
5  The sudden and romantic appearance of his son in the lists at Ashby, he had justly regarded as almost a death's blow to his hopes.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVIII
6  Cedric, who had been struck mute by the sudden appearance of his banished son, now rushed forward, as if to separate him from Rowena.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER XII
7  Higg, the son of Snell, at length replied, "I am but a maimed man, but that I can at all stir or move was owing to her charitable assistance."
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXVIII
8  The restoration of the independence of his race was the idol of his heart, to which he had willingly sacrificed domestic happiness and the interests of his own son.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVIII
9  Probably the same motives which induced Cedric to open his hall to this son of a rejected people, would have made him insist on his attendants receiving Isaac with more courtesy.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER V
10  The Saxon had been under very intense and agonizing apprehensions concerning his son; for Nature had asserted her rights, in spite of the patriotic stoicism which laboured to disown her.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVIII
11  An obstacle occurred to this his favourite project, in the mutual attachment of his ward and his son and hence the original cause of the banishment of Wilfred from the house of his father.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVIII
12  When Cedric the Saxon saw his son drop down senseless in the lists at Ashby, his first impulse was to order him into the custody and care of his own attendants, but the words choked in his throat.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVIII
13  At the bottom of this document was scrawled, in the first place, a rude sketch of a cock's head and comb, with a legend expressing this hieroglyphic to be the sign-manual of Wamba, son of Witless.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXV
14  In the meantime, he was strengthening his own faction in the kingdom, of which he proposed to dispute the succession, in case of the King's death, with the legitimate heir, Arthur Duke of Brittany, son of Geoffrey Plantagenet, the elder brother of John.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER VII
15  Higg, the son of Snell, withdrew into the crowd, but, interested in the fate of his benefactress, lingered until he should learn her doom, even at the risk of again encountering the frown of that severe judge, the terror of which withered his very heart within him.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXVII
16  On one side of his tent were pitched those of Reginald Front-de-Boeuf and Richard de Malvoisin, and on the other was the pavilion of Hugh de Grantmesnil, a noble baron in the vicinity, whose ancestor had been Lord High Steward of England in the time of the Conqueror, and his son William Rufus.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER VII
17  Then Higg, son of Snell," said the Grand Master, "I tell thee it is better to be bedridden, than to accept the benefit of unbelievers' medicine that thou mayest arise and walk; better to despoil infidels of their treasure by the strong hand, than to accept of them benevolent gifts, or do them service for wages.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXVII
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