SPRING in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte
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 Current Search - spring in Wuthering Heights
1  I felt that God had forsaken the stray sheep there to its own wicked wanderings, and an evil beast prowled between it and the fold, waiting his time to spring and destroy.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER X
2  Catherine, last spring at this time, I was longing to have you under this roof; now, I wish you were a mile or two up those hills: the air blows so sweetly, I feel that it would cure you.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XIII
3  He pressed its hand, and kissed the sarcastic, savage face that every one else shrank from contemplating; and bemoaned him with that strong grief which springs naturally from a generous heart, though it be tough as tempered steel.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXIV
4  I leant forward also, for the purpose of signing to Heathcliff, whose step I recognised, not to come further; and, at the instant when my eye quitted Hareton, he gave a sudden spring, delivered himself from the careless grasp that held him, and fell.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER IX
5  An instant they held asunder, and then how they met I hardly saw, but Catherine made a spring, and he caught her, and they were locked in an embrace from which I thought my mistress would never be released alive: in fact, to my eyes, she seemed directly insensible.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XV
6  I was comfortably revelling in the spring fragrance around, and the beautiful soft blue overhead, when my young lady, who had run down near the gate to procure some primrose roots for a border, returned only half laden, and informed us that Mr. Heathcliff was coming in.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXIV
7  This twentieth of March was a beautiful spring day, and when her father had retired, my young lady came down dressed for going out, and said she asked to have a ramble on the edge of the moor with me: Mr. Linton had given her leave, if we went only a short distance and were back within the hour.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXI
8  For one thing, she was forbidden to move out of the garden, and it fretted her sadly to be confined to its narrow bounds as spring drew on; for another, in following the house, I was forced to quit her frequently, and she complained of loneliness: she preferred quarrelling with Joseph in the kitchen to sitting at peace in her solitude.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXII