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Quotes from Hard Times by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - state in Hard Times
1  I wish to hear you state it to me, father.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XV
2  She made him her stately curtsey in the garden, one morning before breakfast.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VII
3  Mr. Gradgrind walked homeward from the school, in a state of considerable satisfaction.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER III
4  She supervised the meal officially, but implied that in her own stately person she considered lunch a weakness.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XI
5  We are the largest party in the state, I assure you, Mrs. Bounderby, if we all fell out of our adopted ranks and were reviewed together.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER II
6  She hurried by the train to town, she ran from town to this house, through a raging storm, and presented herself before me in a state of distraction.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER III
7  Mr. James Harthouse passed a whole night and a day in a state of so much hurry, that the World, with its best glass in his eye, would scarcely have recognized him during that insane interval, as the brother Jem of the honourable and jocular member.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER I
8  But, I am not in a very agreeable state, I tell you plainly: not relishing this business, even as it is, and not considering that I am at any time as dutifully and submissively treated by your daughter, as Josiah Bounderby of Coketown ought to be treated by his wife.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER III
9  Her capacity of definition might be easily stated at a very low figure, her mathematical knowledge at nothing; yet he was not sure that if he had been required, for example, to tick her off into columns in a parliamentary return, he would have quite known how to divide her.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XIV
10  What with a cooling drink adapted to the weather, but not so weak as cool; and what with a rarer tobacco than was to be bought in those parts; Tom was soon in a highly free and easy state at his end of the sofa, and more than ever disposed to admire his new friend at the other end.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER II
11  It had a black canal in it, and a river that ran purple with ill-smelling dye, and vast piles of building full of windows where there was a rattling and a trembling all day long, and where the piston of the steam-engine worked monotonously up and down, like the head of an elephant in a state of melancholy madness.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V