SUFFER in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - suffer in Pride and Prejudice
1  But in matters of greater weight, I may suffer from want of money.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 33
2  People who suffer as I do from nervous complaints can have no great inclination for talking.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 20
3  My mother means well; but she does not know, no one can know, how much I suffer from what she says.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 53
4  As for Wickham and Lydia, their characters suffered no revolution from the marriage of her sisters.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 61
5  She blushed, and Jane blushed; but the cheeks of the two who caused their confusion suffered no variation of colour.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 51
6  Mr. Darcy's shameful boast of what misery he had been able to inflict, gave her a keener sense of her sister's sufferings.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 34
7  They contained no actual complaint, nor was there any revival of past occurrences, or any communication of present suffering.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 34
8  He thought too well of himself to comprehend on what motives his cousin could refuse him; and though his pride was hurt, he suffered in no other way.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 20
9  His pride, in that direction, may be of service, if not to himself, to many others, for it must only deter him from such foul misconduct as I have suffered by.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 41
10  If his own vanity, however, did not mislead him, he was the cause, his pride and caprice were the cause, of all that Jane had suffered, and still continued to suffer.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 33
11  If his own vanity, however, did not mislead him, he was the cause, his pride and caprice were the cause, of all that Jane had suffered, and still continued to suffer.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 33
12  The first half-hour was spent in piling up the fire, lest she should suffer from the change of room; and she removed at his desire to the other side of the fireplace, that she might be further from the door.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 11
13  The discussion of Mr. Collins's offer was now nearly at an end, and Elizabeth had only to suffer from the uncomfortable feelings necessarily attending it, and occasionally from some peevish allusions of her mother.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 21
14  I feel myself called upon, by our relationship, and my situation in life, to condole with you on the grievous affliction you are now suffering under, of which we were yesterday informed by a letter from Hertfordshire.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 48
15  The whole of what Elizabeth had already heard, his claims on Mr. Darcy, and all that he had suffered from him, was now openly acknowledged and publicly canvassed; and everybody was pleased to know how much they had always disliked Mr. Darcy before they had known anything of the matter.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 24
16  I am sure," she added, "if it was not for such good friends I do not know what would become of her, for she is very ill indeed, and suffers a vast deal, though with the greatest patience in the world, which is always the way with her, for she has, without exception, the sweetest temper I have ever met with.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 9
17  Mrs. Bennet, to whose apartment they all repaired, after a few minutes' conversation together, received them exactly as might be expected; with tears and lamentations of regret, invectives against the villainous conduct of Wickham, and complaints of her own sufferings and ill-usage; blaming everybody but the person to whose ill-judging indulgence the errors of her daughter must principally be owing.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 47