SUN in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from The Aeneid by Virgil
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 Current Search - sun in The Aeneid
1  The sun sets meanwhile, and the dusky hills grow dim.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK THIRD
2  Meanwhile the sun rounds the great circle of the year, and icy winter ruffles the waters with Northern gales.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK THIRD
3  Here an ampler air clothes the meadows in lustrous sheen, and they know their own sun and a starlight of their own.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK SIXTH
4  Hard by the ocean limit and the set of sun is the extreme Aethiopian land, where ancient Atlas turns on his shoulders the starred burning axletree of heaven.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK FOURTH
5  Of set purpose and willing mind do we draw nigh this thy city, outcasts from a realm once the greatest that the sun looked on as he came from Olympus' utmost border.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK SEVENTH
6  The fiery sun had climbed midway in the circle of the sky when they see afar fortress walls and scattered house roofs, where now the might of Rome hath risen high as heaven; then Evander held a slender state.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK EIGHTH
7  Apart in the sea and over against the foaming beach, lies a rock that the swoln waves beat and drown what time the north-western gales of winter blot out the stars; in calm it rises silent out of the placid water, flat-topped, and a haunt where cormorants love best to take the sun.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK FIFTH
8  How terrible the tempest that burst from fierce Mycenae over the plains of Ida, driven by what fate Europe and Asia met in the shock of two worlds, even he hath heard who is sundered in the utmost land where the ocean surge recoils, and he whom stretching midmost of the four zones the zone of the intolerable sun holds in severance.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK SEVENTH
9  Long-haired Iopas on his gilded lyre fills the chamber with songs ancient Atlas taught; he sings of the wandering moon and the sun's travails; whence is the human race and the brute, whence water and fire; of Arcturus, the rainy Hyades, and the twin Oxen; why wintry suns make such haste to dip in ocean, or what delay makes the nights drag lingeringly.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK FIRST
10  Long-haired Iopas on his gilded lyre fills the chamber with songs ancient Atlas taught; he sings of the wandering moon and the sun's travails; whence is the human race and the brute, whence water and fire; of Arcturus, the rainy Hyades, and the twin Oxen; why wintry suns make such haste to dip in ocean, or what delay makes the nights drag lingeringly.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK FIRST
11  Thus had he spoken; when from beneath the sanctuary a snake slid out in seven vast coils and sevenfold slippery spires, quietly circling the grave and gliding from altar to altar, his green chequered body and the spotted lustre of his scales ablaze with gold, as the bow in the cloud darts a thousand changing dyes athwart the sun: Aeneas stood amazed at the sight.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK FIFTH
12  Here is he, he of whose promise once and again thou hearest, Caesar Augustus, a god's son, who shall again establish the ages of gold in Latium over the fields that once were Saturn's realm, and carry his empire afar to Garamant and Indian, to the land that lies beyond our stars, beyond the sun's yearlong ways, where Atlas the sky-bearer wheels on his shoulder the glittering star-spangled pole.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK SIXTH
13  Right before the vestibule and in the front doorway Pyrrhus moves rejoicingly in the sparkle of arms and gleaming brass: like as when a snake fed on poisonous herbs, whom chill winter kept hid and swollen underground, now fresh from his weeds outworn and shining in youth, wreathes his slippery body into the daylight, his upreared breast meets the sun, and his triple-cloven tongue flickers in his mouth.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK SECOND