TAKE in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald
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 Current Search - take in The Great Gatsby
1  It wouldn't take up much of your time and you might pick up a nice bit of money.
The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald
ContextHighlight   In Chapter 5
2  A dim background started to take shape behind him but at her next remark it faded away.
The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald
ContextHighlight   In Chapter 3
3  He set down the receiver and came toward us, glistening slightly, to take our stiff straw hats.
The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald
ContextHighlight   In Chapter 7
4  Instead of taking the short cut along the Sound we went down the road and entered by the big postern.
The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald
ContextHighlight   In Chapter 5
5  Next to him stood a motorcycle policeman taking down names with much sweat and correction in a little book.
The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald
ContextHighlight   In Chapter 7
6  Go ahead," answered Daisy genially, "And if you want to take down any addresses here's my little gold pencil.
The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald
ContextHighlight   In Chapter 6
7  He fumbled at the embroidered coverlet, trying to take it from the bed, and lay down stiffly--was instantly asleep.
The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald
ContextHighlight   In Chapter 9
8  So I take advantage of this short halt, while Gatsby, so to speak, caught his breath, to clear this set of misconceptions away.
The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald
ContextHighlight   In Chapter 6
9  He had intended, probably, to take what he could and go--but now he found that he had committed himself to the following of a grail.
The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald
ContextHighlight   In Chapter 8
10  For a moment a phrase tried to take shape in my mouth and my lips parted like a dumb man's, as though there was more struggling upon them than a wisp of startled air.
The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald
ContextHighlight   In Chapter 6
11  She held my hand impersonally, as a promise that she'd take care of me in a minute, and gave ear to two girls in twin yellow dresses who stopped at the foot of the steps.
The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald
ContextHighlight   In Chapter 3
12  I went up to New York with Tom on the train one afternoon and when we stopped by the ashheaps he jumped to his feet and taking hold of my elbow literally forced me from the car.
The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald
ContextHighlight   In Chapter 2
13  At high tide in the afternoon I watched his guests diving from the tower of his raft or taking the sun on the hot sand of his beach while his two motor-boats slit the waters of the Sound, drawing aquaplanes over cataracts of foam.
The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald
ContextHighlight   In Chapter 3
14  I don't mean that he had traded on his phantom millions, but he had deliberately given Daisy a sense of security; he let her believe that he was a person from much the same stratum as herself--that he was fully able to take care of her.
The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald
ContextHighlight   In Chapter 8
15  The practical thing was to find rooms in the city but it was a warm season and I had just left a country of wide lawns and friendly trees, so when a young man at the office suggested that we take a house together in a commuting town it sounded like a great idea.
The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald
ContextHighlight   In Chapter 1
16  Gatsby looked with vacant eyes through a copy of Clay's "Economics," starting at the Finnish tread that shook the kitchen floor and peering toward the bleared windows from time to time as if a series of invisible but alarming happenings were taking place outside.
The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald
ContextHighlight   In Chapter 5
17  This is a valley of ashes--a fantastic farm where ashes grow like wheat into ridges and hills and grotesque gardens where ashes take the forms of houses and chimneys and rising smoke and finally, with a transcendent effort, of men who move dimly and already crumbling through the powdery air.
The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald
ContextHighlight   In Chapter 2
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