THE FIRE in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - the fire in Great Expectations
1  I could not help looking at the fire, in an obvious state of doubt.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VII
2  My thoughts strayed from that question as I looked disconsolately at the fire.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter II
3  I too sat down before the fire and gazed at the coals, and nothing was said for a long time.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XVIII
4  "Well, boy," Uncle Pumblechook began, as soon as he was seated in the chair of honor by the fire.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter IX
5  Joe made the fire and swept the hearth, and then we went to the door to listen for the chaise-cart.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VII
6  As he looked at the fire, I thought I saw a cunning expression, followed by a half-laugh, come into his face.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter X
7  There was a group assembled round the fire at the Three Jolly Bargemen, attentive to Mr. Wopsle as he read the newspaper aloud.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XVIII
8  At this dismal intelligence, I twisted the only button on my waistcoat round and round, and looked in great depression at the fire.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter II
9  My sister looked at Pumblechook: who smoothed the elbows of his wooden arm-chair, and nodded at her and at the fire, as if he had known all about it beforehand.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIII
10  One of the soldiers opened its wooden windows, another lighted the fire, another turned to at the bellows, the rest stood round the blaze, which was soon roaring.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter V
11  I could see nothing of the room except the shining of the fire in the window-glass, but I stiffened in all my joints with the consciousness that I was under close inspection.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XI
12  Well, Pip," said Joe, taking up the poker, and settling himself to his usual occupation when he was thoughtful, of slowly raking the fire between the lower bars; "I'll tell you.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VII
13  We got a chair out, ready for Mrs. Joe's alighting, and stirred up the fire that they might see a bright window, and took a final survey of the kitchen that nothing might be out of its place.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VII
14  While we stood in the hut, he stood before the fire looking thoughtfully at it, or putting up his feet by turns upon the hob, and looking thoughtfully at them as if he pitied them for their recent adventures.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter V
15  Mrs. Joe was soon landed, and Uncle Pumblechook was soon down too, covering the mare with a cloth, and we were soon all in the kitchen, carrying so much cold air in with us that it seemed to drive all the heat out of the fire.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VII
16  Then, as the marsh winds made the fire glow and flare, I thought I heard the voice outside, of the man with the iron on his leg who had sworn me to secrecy, declaring that he couldn't and wouldn't starve until to-morrow, but must be fed now.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter II
17  When I was very small and timid, he gave me to understand that the Devil lived in a black corner of the forge, and that he knew the fiend very well: also that it was necessary to make up the fire, once in seven years, with a live boy, and that I might consider myself fuel.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XV
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