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Quotes from The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain
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1  But Tom did not wait for the rest.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER I
2  She resurrected nothing but the cat.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
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3  He was not the Model Boy of the village.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
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4  Can't learn an old dog new tricks, as the saying is.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
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5  But in spite of her, Tom knew where the wind lay, now.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
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6  Spare the rod and spile the child, as the Good Book says.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
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7  I ain't doing my duty by that boy, and that's the Lord's truth, goodness knows.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
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8  The lad fled on the instant, scrambled up the high board-fence, and disappeared over it.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
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9  A new-comer of any age or either sex was an im-pressive curiosity in the poor little shabby village of St. Petersburg.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
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10  Well-a-well, man that is born of woman is of few days and full of trouble, as the Scripture says, and I reckon it's so.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
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11  The old lady pulled her spectacles down and looked over them about the room; then she put them up and looked out under them.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
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12  She went to the open door and stood in it and looked out among the tomato vines and "jimpson" weeds that constituted the garden.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
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13  There was a slight noise behind her and she turned just in time to seize a small boy by the slack of his roundabout and arrest his flight.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
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14  Presently the confusion took form, and through the fog of battle Tom appeared, seated astride the new boy, and pounding him with his fists.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
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15  And it flattered her to reflect that she had discovered that the shirt was dry without anybody knowing that that was what she had in her mind.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
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16  Diligence and attention soon gave him the knack of it, and he strode down the street with his mouth full of harmony and his soul full of gratitude.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
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17  She did not finish, for by this time she was bending down and punching under the bed with the broom, and so she needed breath to punctuate the punches with.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
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18  The more Tom stared at the splendid marvel, the higher he turned up his nose at his finery and the shabbier and shabbier his own outfit seemed to him to grow.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
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19  To which Tom responded with jeers, and started off in high feather, and as soon as his back was turned the new boy snatched up a stone, threw it and hit him between the shoulders and then turned tail and ran like an antelope.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
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20  In an instant both boys were rolling and tumbling in the dirt, gripped together like cats; and for the space of a minute they tugged and tore at each other's hair and clothes, punched and scratched each other's nose, and covered themselves with dust and glory.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
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