THOUGHT in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - thought in Pride and Prejudice
1  Perhaps he thought her too young.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 9
2  I had not thought so very ill of him.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 16
3  It was really a very handsome thought.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 18
4  This information made Elizabeth smile, as she thought of poor Miss Bingley.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 16
5  I thought Miss Elizabeth Bennet looked remarkably well when she came into the room this morning.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 8
6  Elizabeth honoured him for such feelings, and thought him handsomer than ever as he expressed them.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 16
7  Mr. Darcy smiled; but Elizabeth thought she could perceive that he was rather offended, and therefore checked her laugh.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 10
8  Of having another daughter married to Mr. Collins, she thought with equal certainty, and with considerable, though not equal, pleasure.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 18
9  Mrs. Bennet wondered at their coming, and thought them very wrong to give so much trouble, and was sure Jane would have caught cold again.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 12
10  He thought too well of himself to comprehend on what motives his cousin could refuse him; and though his pride was hurt, he suffered in no other way.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 20
11  About a month ago I received this letter; and about a fortnight ago I answered it, for I thought it a case of some delicacy, and requiring early attention.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 13
12  Of this she was perfectly unaware; to her he was only the man who made himself agreeable nowhere, and who had not thought her handsome enough to dance with.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 6
13  The indirect boast; for you are really proud of your defects in writing, because you consider them as proceeding from a rapidity of thought and carelessness of execution, which, if not estimable, you think at least highly interesting.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 10
14  Jane pictured to herself a happy evening in the society of her two friends, and the attentions of her brother; and Elizabeth thought with pleasure of dancing a great deal with Mr. Wickham, and of seeing a confirmation of everything in Mr. Darcy's look and behaviour.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 17
15  During dinner, Mr. Bennet scarcely spoke at all; but when the servants were withdrawn, he thought it time to have some conversation with his guest, and therefore started a subject in which he expected him to shine, by observing that he seemed very fortunate in his patroness.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 14
16  I do not know the particulars, but I know very well that Mr. Darcy is not in the least to blame, that he cannot bear to hear George Wickham mentioned, and that though my brother thought that he could not well avoid including him in his invitation to the officers, he was excessively glad to find that he had taken himself out of the way.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 18
17  The sisters, on hearing this, repeated three or four times how much they were grieved, how shocking it was to have a bad cold, and how excessively they disliked being ill themselves; and then thought no more of the matter: and their indifference towards Jane when not immediately before them restored Elizabeth to the enjoyment of all her former dislike.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 8
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