TIME in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - time in A Christmas Carol
1  "The whole time," said the Ghost.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 1 MARLEY'S GHOST
2  "My time grows short," observed the Spirit.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 2 THE FIRST OF THE THREE SPIRITS
3  At this time of the rolling year," the spectre said, "I suffer most.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 1 MARLEY'S GHOST
4  During the whole of this time Scrooge had acted like a man out of his wits.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 2 THE FIRST OF THE THREE SPIRITS
5  You couldn't have predicted, at any given time, what would become of them next.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 2 THE FIRST OF THE THREE SPIRITS
6  We choose this time, because it is a time, of all others, when Want is keenly felt, and Abundance rejoices.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 1 MARLEY'S GHOST
7  He gave the cap a parting squeeze, in which his hand relaxed; and had barely time to reel to bed before he sank into a heavy sleep.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 2 THE FIRST OF THE THREE SPIRITS
8  A very, very brief time, and you will dismiss the recollection of it gladly, as an unprofitable dream, from which it happened well that you awoke.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 2 THE FIRST OF THE THREE SPIRITS
9  It is enough that by degrees, the children and their emotions got out of the parlour, and, by one stair at a time, up to the top of the house, where they went to bed, and so subsided.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 2 THE FIRST OF THE THREE SPIRITS
10  He felt that he was restored to consciousness in the right nick of time, for the especial purpose of holding a conference with the second messenger dispatched to him through Jacob Marley's intervention.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 3 THE SECOND OF THE THREE SPIRITS
11  At this festive season of the year, Mr. Scrooge," said the gentleman, taking up a pen, "it is more than usually desirable that we should make some slight provision for the poor and destitute, who suffer greatly at the present time.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 1 MARLEY'S GHOST
12  Master Scrooge's trunk being by this time tied on to the top of the chaise, the children bade the schoolmaster good-bye right willingly; and, getting into it, drove gaily down the garden sweep; the quick wheels dashing the hoar frost and snow from off the dark leaves of the evergreens like spray.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 2 THE FIRST OF THE THREE SPIRITS
13  But now a knocking at the door was heard, and such a rush immediately ensued that she, with laughing face and plundered dress, was borne towards it in the centre of a flushed and boisterous group, just in time to greet the father, who came home attended by a man laden with Christmas toys and presents.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 2 THE FIRST OF THE THREE SPIRITS
14  It would have been in vain for Scrooge to plead that the weather and the hour were not adapted to pedestrian purposes; that bed was warm, and the thermometer a long way below freezing; that he was clad but lightly in his slippers, dressing-gown, and nightcap; and that he had a cold upon him at that time.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 2 THE FIRST OF THE THREE SPIRITS
15  The crisp leaves of holly, mistletoe, and ivy reflected back the light, as if so many little mirrors had been scattered there; and such a mighty blaze went roaring up the chimney as that dull petrifaction of a hearth had never known in Scrooge's time, or Marley's, or for many and many a winter season gone.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 3 THE SECOND OF THE THREE SPIRITS
16  Here he produced a decanter of curiously light wine, and a block of curiously heavy cake, and administered instalments of those dainties to the young people: at the same time sending out a meagre servant to offer a glass of "something" to the postboy who answered that he thanked the gentleman, but, if it was the same tap as he had tasted before, he had rather not.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 2 THE FIRST OF THE THREE SPIRITS
17  Gentlemen of the free-and-easy sort, who plume themselves on being acquainted with a move or two, and being usually equal to the time of day, express the wide range of their capacity for adventure by observing that they are good for anything from pitch-and-toss to manslaughter; between which opposite extremes, no doubt, there lies a tolerably wide and comprehensive range of subjects.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 3 THE SECOND OF THE THREE SPIRITS
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