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Quotes from The Souls of Black Folk by W. E. B. Du Bois
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 Current Search - time in The Souls of Black Folk
1  As the time flew, however, he began to grasp a new idea.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In I
2  Little Doc, the boy born since the time of my school, took me horseback down the creek next morning toward Farmer Dowell's.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In IV
3  A people thus handicapped ought not to be asked to race with the world, but rather allowed to give all its time and thought to its own social problems.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
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4  For a time Price arose as a new leader, destined, it seemed, not to give up, but to re-state the old ideals in a form less repugnant to the white South.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In III
5  Once upon a time I taught school in the hills of Tennessee, where the broad dark vale of the Mississippi begins to roll and crumple to greet the Alleghanies.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
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6  Mr. Washington represents in Negro thought the old attitude of adjustment and submission; but adjustment at such a peculiar time as to make his programme unique.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
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7  For the first time he sought to analyze the burden he bore upon his back, that dead-weight of social degradation partially masked behind a half-named Negro problem.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
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8  He insists on thrift and self-respect, but at the same time counsels a silent submission to civic inferiority such as is bound to sap the manhood of any race in the long run.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
Get Context   In III
9  Those whose eyes twenty-five and more years before had seen "the glory of the coming of the Lord," saw in every present hindrance or help a dark fatalism bound to bring all things right in His own good time.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
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10  To gain the sympathy and cooperation of the various elements comprising the white South was Mr. Washington's first task; and this, at the time Tuskegee was founded, seemed, for a black man, well-nigh impossible.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
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11  Again, in our own land, the reaction from the sentiment of war time has given impetus to race-prejudice against Negroes, and Mr. Washington withdraws many of the high demands of Negroes as men and American citizens.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
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12  Where all the blame should rest, it is hard to say; whether the Bureau and the Bank died chiefly by reason of the blows of its selfish friends or the dark machinations of its foes, perhaps even time will never reveal, for here lies unwritten history.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
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13  So dawned the time of Sturm und Drang: storm and stress to-day rocks our little boat on the mad waters of the world-sea; there is within and without the sound of conflict, the burning of body and rending of soul; inspiration strives with doubt, and faith with vain questionings.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
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14  And yet the time is come when one may speak in all sincerity and utter courtesy of the mistakes and shortcomings of Mr. Washington's career, as well as of his triumphs, without being thought captious or envious, and without forgetting that it is easier to do ill than well in the world.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
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15  The opponents of the measure declared that the war was over, and the necessity for war measures past; that the Bureau, by reason of its extraordinary powers, was clearly unconstitutional in time of peace, and was destined to irritate the South and pauperize the freedmen, at a final cost of possibly hundreds of millions.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
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16  If the Bureau could have maintained a perfectly judicial attitude, this arrangement would have been ideal, and must in time have gained confidence; but the nature of its other activities and the character of its personnel prejudiced the Bureau in favor of the black litigants, and led without doubt to much injustice and annoyance.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
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17  At the same time the white South, by reason of its sudden conversion from the slavery ideal, by so much the more became set and strengthened in its racial prejudice, and crystallized it into harsh law and harsher custom; while the marvellous pushing forward of the poor white daily threatened to take even bread and butter from the mouths of the heavily handicapped sons of the freedmen.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois
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