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Quotes from The Hound of the Baskervilles by Arthur Conan Doyle
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 Current Search - to have in The Hound of the Baskervilles
1  I should like to have a quiet hour by myself to make up my mind.
The Hound of the Baskervilles By Arthur Conan Doyle
Get Context   In Chapter 4. Sir Henry Baskerville
2  It's a big thing for a man to have to understand and to decide at one sitting.
The Hound of the Baskervilles By Arthur Conan Doyle
Get Context   In Chapter 4. Sir Henry Baskerville
3  "I seem to have walked right into the thick of a dime novel," said our visitor.
The Hound of the Baskervilles By Arthur Conan Doyle
Get Context   In Chapter 4. Sir Henry Baskerville
4  No, sir, no; though I am happy to have had the opportunity of doing that as well.
The Hound of the Baskervilles By Arthur Conan Doyle
Get Context   In Chapter 1. Mr. Sherlock Holmes
5  Sir Charles was a widower, and a man who may be said to have been in some ways of an eccentric habit of mind.
The Hound of the Baskervilles By Arthur Conan Doyle
Get Context   In Chapter 2. The Curse of the Baskervilles
6  "Well, I seem to have come into an inheritance with a vengeance," said he when the long narrative was finished.
The Hound of the Baskervilles By Arthur Conan Doyle
Get Context   In Chapter 4. Sir Henry Baskerville
7  Such is the tale, my sons, of the coming of the hound which is said to have plagued the family so sorely ever since.
The Hound of the Baskervilles By Arthur Conan Doyle
Get Context   In Chapter 2. The Curse of the Baskervilles
8  My brother is very anxious to have the Hall inhabited, for he thinks it is for the good of the poor folk upon the moor.
The Hound of the Baskervilles By Arthur Conan Doyle
Get Context   In Chapter 7. The Stapletons of Merripit House
9  One Murphy, a gipsy horse-dealer, was on the moor at no great distance at the time, but he appears by his own confession to have been the worse for drink.
The Hound of the Baskervilles By Arthur Conan Doyle
Get Context   In Chapter 2. The Curse of the Baskervilles
10  On all sides of you as you walk are the houses of these forgotten folk, with their graves and the huge monoliths which are supposed to have marked their temples.
The Hound of the Baskervilles By Arthur Conan Doyle
Get Context   In Chapter 8. First Report of Dr. Watson
11  He came over to call upon Baskerville on that first day, and the very next morning he took us both to show us the spot where the legend of the wicked Hugo is supposed to have had its origin.
The Hound of the Baskervilles By Arthur Conan Doyle
Get Context   In Chapter 8. First Report of Dr. Watson
12  Then the revellers rode close together, for a great fear was on them, but they still followed over the moor, though each, had he been alone, would have been right glad to have turned his horse's head.
The Hound of the Baskervilles By Arthur Conan Doyle
Get Context   In Chapter 2. The Curse of the Baskervilles
13  Anything which may seem to have a bearing however indirect upon the case, and especially the relations between young Baskerville and his neighbours or any fresh particulars concerning the death of Sir Charles.
The Hound of the Baskervilles By Arthur Conan Doyle
Get Context   In Chapter 6. Baskerville Hall
14  The circumstances connected with the death of Sir Charles cannot be said to have been entirely cleared up by the inquest, but at least enough has been done to dispose of those rumours to which local superstition has given rise.
The Hound of the Baskervilles By Arthur Conan Doyle
Get Context   In Chapter 2. The Curse of the Baskervilles
15  One fact which has not been explained is the statement of Barrymore that his master's footprints altered their character from the time that he passed the moor-gate, and that he appeared from thence onward to have been walking upon his toes.
The Hound of the Baskervilles By Arthur Conan Doyle
Get Context   In Chapter 2. The Curse of the Baskervilles
16  Now, the poor lass upstairs was like to have her wits turned at the singing and shouting and terrible oaths which came up to her from below, for they say that the words used by Hugo Baskerville, when he was in wine, were such as might blast the man who said them.
The Hound of the Baskervilles By Arthur Conan Doyle
Get Context   In Chapter 2. The Curse of the Baskervilles
17  I followed the footsteps down the yew alley, I saw the spot at the moor-gate where he seemed to have waited, I remarked the change in the shape of the prints after that point, I noted that there were no other footsteps save those of Barrymore on the soft gravel, and finally I carefully examined the body, which had not been touched until my arrival.
The Hound of the Baskervilles By Arthur Conan Doyle
Get Context   In Chapter 2. The Curse of the Baskervilles
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