TOWN in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - town in Great Expectations
1  Tain't only one wot can go up town.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XV
2  "As to Pip, he's going up town," said Joe.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XV
3  Beyond town, we found a heavy mist out, and it fell wet and thick.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XV
4  "Well then, as to Old Orlick, he's a going up town," retorted that worthy.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XV
5  The journey from our town to the metropolis was a journey of about five hours.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XX
6  It being market morning at a neighboring town some ten miles off, Mr. Pumblechook was not at home.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIX
7  It was clear that I must repair to our town next day, and in the first flow of my repentance, it was equally clear that I must stay at Joe's.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXVIII
8  Mr. Pumblechook's premises in the High Street of the market town, were of a peppercorny and farinaceous character, as the premises of a cornchandler and seedsman should be.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
9  My depression was not alleviated by the announcement, for, I had supposed that establishment to be an hotel kept by Mr. Barnard, to which the Blue Boar in our town was a mere public-house.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXI
10  However, I came into town on the Monday night to be ready for Joe, and I got up early in the morning, and caused the sitting-room and breakfast-table to assume their most splendid appearance.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXVII
11  I have been thinking, Joe, that when I go down town on Monday, and order my new clothes, I shall tell the tailor that I'll come and put them on there, or that I'll have them sent to Mr. Pumblechook's.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XVIII
12  We walked to town, my sister leading the way in a very large beaver bonnet, and carrying a basket like the Great Seal of England in plaited Straw, a pair of pattens, a spare shawl, and an umbrella, though it was a fine bright day.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIII
13  Now, as to Orlick; he had gone to town exactly as he told us when we picked him up at the turnpike, he had been seen about town all the evening, he had been in divers companies in several public-houses, and he had come back with myself and Mr. Wopsle.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XVI
14  Putting on the best clothes I had, I went into town as early as I could hope to find the shops open, and presented myself before Mr. Trabb, the tailor, who was having his breakfast in the parlor behind his shop, and who did not think it worth his while to come out to me, but called me in to him.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIX
15  So subdued I was by those tears, and by their breaking out again in the course of the quiet walk, that when I was on the coach, and it was clear of the town, I deliberated with an aching heart whether I would not get down when we changed horses and walk back, and have another evening at home, and a better parting.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIX
16  For you do not know that Uncle Pumblechook, being sensible that for anything we can tell, this boy's fortune may be made by his going to Miss Havisham's, has offered to take him into town to-night in his own chaise-cart, and to keep him to-night, and to take him with his own hands to Miss Havisham's to-morrow morning.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VII
17  But the old boy was so far from responding, that he would not even walk to Hammersmith on the same side of the way; so Herbert and I, who remained in town, saw them going down the street on opposite sides; Startop leading, and Drummle lagging behind in the shadow of the houses, much as he was wont to follow in his boat.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXVI
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