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Quotes from Hard Times by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - travel in Hard Times
1  He had travelled a long way, he wath in a very bad condithon, he wath lame, and pretty well blind.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER VIII
2  The black eyes kept upon the railroad-carriage in which she had travelled, settled upon it a moment too late.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER X
3  It had cleared the sky before it, and the rain had spent itself or travelled elsewhere, and the stars were bright.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XIII
4  The connection between the two places was by a hilly turnpike-road, and the travelling on that road was very slow.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER VI
5  So James Harthouse reclined in the window, indolently smoking, and reckoning up the steps he had taken on the road by which he happened to be travelling.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VII
6  Early in the afternoon, Mr. Gradgrind walked direct from his own house into the country, to be taken up on the line by which he was to travel; and at night the remaining two set forth upon their different course, encouraged by not seeing any face they knew.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER VI
7  It is remarkable as showing the wide prevalence of this law, that among the natives of the British possessions in India, also in a considerable part of China, and among the Calmucks of Tartary, the best means of computation yet furnished us by travellers, yield similar results.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XV