TREES in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett
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 Current Search - trees in The Secret Garden
1  Then they were on the highroad and she saw hedges and trees.
The Secret Garden By Frances Hodgson Burnett
Get Context   In CHAPTER III
2  They are so busy and having such fun under the earth or in the trees or heather.
The Secret Garden By Frances Hodgson Burnett
Get Context   In CHAPTER XIV
3  There were gardens and paths and big trees, but everything looked dull and wintry.
The Secret Garden By Frances Hodgson Burnett
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
4  There were numbers of standard roses which had so spread their branches that they were like little trees.
The Secret Garden By Frances Hodgson Burnett
Get Context   In CHAPTER IX
5  He began to walk about, looking up in the trees and at the walls and bushes with a thoughtful expression.
The Secret Garden By Frances Hodgson Burnett
Get Context   In CHAPTER XI
6  Mistress Mary was not at all sure that she knew, as Dickon seemed to, how to try to look like grass and trees and bushes.
The Secret Garden By Frances Hodgson Burnett
Get Context   In CHAPTER XV
7  There were fantastically dressed people under the trees and in the distance there was a glimpse of the turrets of a castle.
The Secret Garden By Frances Hodgson Burnett
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
8  She walked under one of the fairy-like gray arches between the trees and looked up at the sprays and tendrils which formed them.
The Secret Garden By Frances Hodgson Burnett
Get Context   In CHAPTER IX
9  There were trees, and flower-beds, and evergreens clipped into strange shapes, and a large pool with an old gray fountain in its midst.
The Secret Garden By Frances Hodgson Burnett
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
10  At last the horses began to go more slowly, as if they were climbing up-hill, and presently there seemed to be no more hedges and no more trees.
The Secret Garden By Frances Hodgson Burnett
Get Context   In CHAPTER III
11  "I shall come back this afternoon," she said, looking all round at her new kingdom, and speaking to the trees and the rose-bushes as if they heard her.
The Secret Garden By Frances Hodgson Burnett
Get Context   In CHAPTER IX
12  She went from place to place, and dug and weeded, and enjoyed herself so immensely that she was led on from bed to bed and into the grass under the trees.
The Secret Garden By Frances Hodgson Burnett
Get Context   In CHAPTER IX
13  It was strong enough to wave the branches of the trees, and it was more than strong enough to sway the trailing sprays of untrimmed ivy hanging from the wall.
The Secret Garden By Frances Hodgson Burnett
Get Context   In CHAPTER VIII
14  Out of a deep window she could see a great climbing stretch of land which seemed to have no trees on it, and to look rather like an endless, dull, purplish sea.
The Secret Garden By Frances Hodgson Burnett
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
15  Swiftly something flew across the wall and darted through the trees to a close grown corner, a little flare of red-breasted bird with something hanging from its beak.
The Secret Garden By Frances Hodgson Burnett
Get Context   In CHAPTER XV
16  There were neither leaves nor roses on them now and Mary did not know whether they were dead or alive, but their thin gray or brown branches and sprays looked like a sort of hazy mantle spreading over everything, walls, and trees, and even brown grass, where they had fallen from their fastenings and run along the ground.
The Secret Garden By Frances Hodgson Burnett
Get Context   In CHAPTER IX
17  There were other trees in the garden, and one of the things which made the place look strangest and loveliest was that climbing roses had run all over them and swung down long tendrils which made light swaying curtains, and here and there they had caught at each other or at a far-reaching branch and had crept from one tree to another and made lovely bridges of themselves.
The Secret Garden By Frances Hodgson Burnett
Get Context   In CHAPTER IX
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