TRUTH in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
Free Online Vocabulary Test
K12, SAT, GRE, IELTS, TOEFL
 Search Panel
Word:
You may input your word or phrase.
Author:
Book:
 
Stems:
If search object is a contraction or phrase, it'll be ignored.
Sort by:
Each search starts from the first page. Its result is limited to the first 17 sentences. If you upgrade to a VIP account, you will see up to 500 sentences for one search.
Common Search Words
 Current Search - truth in Sense and Sensibility
1  I would give anything to know the truth of it.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 14
2  These apprehensions, perhaps, were not founded entirely on reason, and certainly not at all on truth.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 34
3  Elinor could not deny the truth of this, and she tried to find in it a motive sufficient for their silence.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 16
4  Marianne was astonished to find how much the imagination of her mother and herself had outstripped the truth.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4
5  Indeed, to say the truth, I am convinced within myself that your father had no idea of your giving them any money at all.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2
6  When I came to you last week and found you alone, I came determined to know the truth; though irresolute what to do when it WAS known.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 31
7  There is great truth, however, in what you have now urged of the allowances which ought to be made for him, and it is my wish to be candid in my judgment of every body.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 15
8  Most unwilling was she to awaken from such a dream of felicity to comprehend all the unhappy truths which attended the affair; and for some time she refused to submit to them.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 12
9  Whatever the truth of it might be, and far as Elinor was from feeling thorough contentment about it, yet while she saw Marianne in spirits, she could not be very uncomfortable herself.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 27
10  Elinor, for her sister's sake, could not press the subject farther, and she hoped it was not required of her for Willoughby's; since, though Marianne might lose much, he could gain very little by the enforcement of the real truth.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 30
11  No time was to be lost in undeceiving her, in making her acquainted with the real truth, and in endeavouring to bring her to hear it talked of by others, without betraying that she felt any uneasiness for her sister, or any resentment against Edward.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 37
12  Her form, though not so correct as her sister's, in having the advantage of height, was more striking; and her face was so lovely, that when in the common cant of praise, she was called a beautiful girl, truth was less violently outraged than usually happens.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 10
13  Not that Marianne appeared to distrust the truth of any part of it, for she listened to it all with the most steady and submissive attention, made neither objection nor remark, attempted no vindication of Willoughby, and seemed to shew by her tears that she felt it to be impossible.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 32
14  Supported by the conviction of having done nothing to merit her present unhappiness, and consoled by the belief that Edward had done nothing to forfeit her esteem, she thought she could even now, under the first smart of the heavy blow, command herself enough to guard every suspicion of the truth from her mother and sisters.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 23
15  Had it been ten, Elinor would have been convinced that at that moment she heard a carriage driving up to the house; and so strong was the persuasion that she DID, in spite of the ALMOST impossibility of their being already come, that she moved into the adjoining dressing-closet and opened a window shutter, to be satisfied of the truth.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 43