VIRTUE in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
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 Current Search - virtue in Frankenstein
1  Yet my heart overflowed with kindness and the love of virtue.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 9
2  By the virtues that I once possessed, I demand this from you.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 10
3  Once my fancy was soothed with dreams of virtue, of fame, and of enjoyment.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 24
4  I learned, from the views of social life which it developed, to admire their virtues and to deprecate the vices of mankind.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 15
5  My vices are the children of a forced solitude that I abhor, and my virtues will necessarily arise when I live in communion with an equal.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 17
6  When I first sought it, it was the love of virtue, the feelings of happiness and affection with which my whole being overflowed, that I wished to be participated.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 24
7  When actuated by selfish and vicious motives, I asked you to undertake my unfinished work, and I renew this request now, when I am only induced by reason and virtue.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 24
8  I felt the greatest ardour for virtue rise within me, and abhorrence for vice, as far as I understood the signification of those terms, relative as they were, as I applied them, to pleasure and pain alone.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 15
9  I thought of the promise of virtues which he had displayed on the opening of his existence and the subsequent blight of all kindly feeling by the loathing and scorn which his protectors had manifested towards him.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 17
10  He could have endured poverty, and while this distress had been the meed of his virtue, he gloried in it; but the ingratitude of the Turk and the loss of his beloved Safie were misfortunes more bitter and irreparable.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 14
11  The busy stage of life, the virtues of heroes, and the actions of men were his theme; and his hope and his dream was to become one among those whose names are recorded in story as the gallant and adventurous benefactors of our species.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 2
12  A few months before my arrival they had lived in a large and luxurious city called Paris, surrounded by friends and possessed of every enjoyment which virtue, refinement of intellect, or taste, accompanied by a moderate fortune, could afford.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 14
13  I admired virtue and good feelings and loved the gentle manners and amiable qualities of my cottagers, but I was shut out from intercourse with them, except through means which I obtained by stealth, when I was unseen and unknown, and which rather increased than satisfied the desire I had of becoming one among my fellows.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 13
14  These were the reflections of my hours of despondency and solitude; but when I contemplated the virtues of the cottagers, their amiable and benevolent dispositions, I persuaded myself that when they should become acquainted with my admiration of their virtues they would compassionate me and overlook my personal deformity.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 15
15  There was a show of gratitude and worship in his attachment to my mother, differing wholly from the doting fondness of age, for it was inspired by reverence for her virtues and a desire to be the means of, in some degree, recompensing her for the sorrows she had endured, but which gave inexpressible grace to his behaviour to her.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 1
16  This lady died, but her lessons were indelibly impressed on the mind of Safie, who sickened at the prospect of again returning to Asia and being immured within the walls of a harem, allowed only to occupy herself with infantile amusements, ill-suited to the temper of her soul, now accustomed to grand ideas and a noble emulation for virtue.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 14