WATER in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from The Aeneid by Virgil
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 Current Search - water in The Aeneid
1  Servants pour water on their hands, serve corn from baskets, and bring napkins with close-cut pile.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK FIRST
2  We in a flutter of affright shook out the blazing hair and quenched the holy fires with spring water.
The Aeneid By Virgil
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3  Scattered swimmers appear in the vast eddy, armour of men, timbers and Trojan treasure amid the water.
The Aeneid By Virgil
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4  Here the Cyllenian, poised evenly on his wings, made a first stay; hence he shot himself sheer to the water.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK FOURTH
5  We are lifted skyward on the crescent wave, and again sunk deep into the nether world as the water is sucked away.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK THIRD
6  The oars are snapped; the prow swings away and gives her side to the waves; down in a heap comes a broken mountain of water.
The Aeneid By Virgil
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7  Then I bid leave the harbour and sit down at the thwarts; emulously my comrades strike the water, and sweep through the seas.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK THIRD
8  The sails drop; we swing back to the oars; without delay the sailors strongly toss up the foam, and sweep through the green water.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK THIRD
9  Even as bidden they do; and first Palinurus swung the gurgling prow leftward through the water; to the left all our squadron bent with oar and wind.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK THIRD
10  On the right Scylla keeps guard, on the left unassuaged Charybdis, who thrice swallows the vast flood sheer down her swirling gulf, and ever again hurls it upward, lashing the sky with water.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK THIRD
11  We choose a place, and fling ourselves on the lap of earth at the water's edge, and, allotting the oars, spread ourselves on the dry beach for refreshment: the dew of slumber falls on our weary limbs.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK THIRD
12  Not so furiously when a foaming river bursts his banks and overflows, beating down the opposing dykes with whirling water, is he borne mounded over the fields, and sweeps herds and pens all about the plains.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK SECOND
13  On this side and that enormous cliffs rise threatening heaven, and twin crags beneath whose crest the sheltered water lies wide and calm; above hangs a background of flickering forest, and the dark shade of rustling groves.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK FIRST
14  Meanwhile Neptune discerned with astonishment the loud roaring of the vexed sea, the tempest let loose from prison, and the still water boiling up from its depths, and lifting his head calm above the waves, looked forth across the deep.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK FIRST
15  But when at thy departure the wind hath borne thee to the Sicilian coast, and the barred straits of Pelorus open out, steer for the left-hand country and the long circuit of the seas on the left hand; shun the shore and water on thy right.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK THIRD
16  Ere now the stout ship of Ilioneus, ere now of brave Achates, and she wherein Abas rode, and she wherein aged Aletes, have yielded to the storm; through the shaken fastenings of their sides they all draw in the deadly water, and their opening seams give way.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK FIRST
17  Long-haired Iopas on his gilded lyre fills the chamber with songs ancient Atlas taught; he sings of the wandering moon and the sun's travails; whence is the human race and the brute, whence water and fire; of Arcturus, the rainy Hyades, and the twin Oxen; why wintry suns make such haste to dip in ocean, or what delay makes the nights drag lingeringly.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK FIRST
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