WEAR in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde
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 Current Search - wear in The Picture of Dorian Gray
1  Never trust a woman who wears mauve, whatever her age may be, or a woman over thirty-five who is fond of pink ribbons.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 8
2  She has been mad, and has come into the presence of a guilty king, and given him rue to wear and bitter herbs to taste of.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4
3  And when a woman finds that out about her husband, she either becomes dreadfully dowdy, or wears very smart bonnets that some other woman's husband has to pay for.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 8
4  That evening, at eight-thirty, exquisitely dressed and wearing a large button-hole of Parma violets, Dorian Gray was ushered into Lady Narborough's drawing-room by bowing servants.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 15
5  It was true that as one watched life in its curious crucible of pain and pleasure, one could not wear over one's face a mask of glass, nor keep the sulphurous fumes from troubling the brain and making the imagination turbid with monstrous fancies and misshapen dreams.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4
6  The praise of folly, as he went on, soared into a philosophy, and philosophy herself became young, and catching the mad music of pleasure, wearing, one might fancy, her wine-stained robe and wreath of ivy, danced like a Bacchante over the hills of life, and mocked the slow Silenus for being sober.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3
7  In the long cedar chests that lined the west gallery of his house, he had stored away many rare and beautiful specimens of what is really the raiment of the Bride of Christ, who must wear purple and jewels and fine linen that she may hide the pallid macerated body that is worn by the suffering that she seeks for and wounded by self-inflicted pain.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 11