WEATHER in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - weather in Sense and Sensibility
1  Such weather makes every thing and every body disgusting.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 20
2  The weather was remarkably fine, and she readily consented.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 33
3  Her love made no answer; and after slightly bowing to the ladies, began complaining of the weather.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 20
4  They attempted, therefore, likewise, to excuse themselves; the weather was uncertain, and not likely to be good.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 19
5  But it was then too late, and with a countenance meaning to be open, she sat down again and talked of the weather.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 48
6  And Marianne was in spirits; happy in the mildness of the weather, and still happier in her expectation of a frost.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 27
7  When the weather is settled, and I have recovered my strength," said she, "we will take long walks together every day.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 46
8  "It is charming weather for THEM indeed," she continued, as she sat down to the breakfast table with a happy countenance.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 27
9  Marianne had been two or three days at home, before the weather was fine enough for an invalid like herself to venture out.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 46
10  The morning was fine and dry, and Marianne, in her plan of employment abroad, had not calculated for any change of weather during their stay at Cleveland.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 42
11  If this open weather holds much longer," said Mrs. Jennings, when they met at breakfast the following morning, "Sir John will not like leaving Barton next week; 'tis a sad thing for sportsmen to lose a day's pleasure.'
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 27
12  It was very early in September; the season was fine, and from first seeing the place under the advantage of good weather, they received an impression in its favour which was of material service in recommending it to their lasting approbation.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 6
13  Sir John called on them as soon as the next interval of fair weather that morning allowed him to get out of doors; and Marianne's accident being related to him, he was eagerly asked whether he knew any gentleman of the name of Willoughby at Allenham.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 9
14  She had depended on a twilight walk to the Grecian temple, and perhaps all over the grounds, and an evening merely cold or damp would not have deterred her from it; but a heavy and settled rain even SHE could not fancy dry or pleasant weather for walking.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 42
15  The weather was not tempting enough to draw the two others from their pencil and their book, in spite of Marianne's declaration that the day would be lastingly fair, and that every threatening cloud would be drawn off from their hills; and the two girls set off together.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 9