WHAT in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from The Aeneid by Virgil
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 Current Search - what in The Aeneid
1  You of my household, give heed to what I say.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK SECOND
2  I look back and survey what force is around me.
The Aeneid By Virgil
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3  Perchance too thou mayest inquire what was Priam's fate.
The Aeneid By Virgil
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4  Now, by what means the present need may be fulfilled, attend and I will explain in brief.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK FOURTH
5  And now many an one foretold me the villain's craft and cruelty, and silently saw what was to come.
The Aeneid By Virgil
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6  We encourage him to tell who he is and of what blood born, and reveal how Fortune pursues him since then.
The Aeneid By Virgil
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7  Thou hast what all thy soul desired; Dido is on fire with love, and hath caught the madness through and through.
The Aeneid By Virgil
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8  That night we spend in cover of the forest among portentous horrors, and see not from what source the noise comes.
The Aeneid By Virgil
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9  At that lament our spirit was changed, and all assault stayed: we encourage him to speak, and tell of what blood he is sprung, or what assurance he brings his captors.
The Aeneid By Virgil
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10  Why the broad blaze is lit lies unknown; but the bitter pain of a great love trampled, and the knowledge of what woman can do in madness, draw the Teucrians' hearts to gloomy guesses.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK FIFTH
11  My father counsels to remeasure the sea and go again to Phoebus in his Ortygian oracle, to pray for grace and ask what issue he ordains to our exhausted state; whence he bids us search for aid to our woes, whither bend our course.
The Aeneid By Virgil
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12  But the Queen, the pyre being built up of piled faggots and sawn ilex in the inmost of her dwelling, hangs the room with chaplets and garlands it with funeral boughs: on the pillow she lays the dress he wore, the sword he left, and an image of him, knowing what was to come.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK FOURTH
13  Apart in the sea and over against the foaming beach, lies a rock that the swoln waves beat and drown what time the north-western gales of winter blot out the stars; in calm it rises silent out of the placid water, flat-topped, and a haunt where cormorants love best to take the sun.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK FIFTH
14  But good Aeneas, nightlong revolving many and many a thing, issues forth, so soon as bountiful light is given, to explore the strange country; to what coasts the wind has borne him, who are their habitants, men or wild beasts, for all he sees is wilderness; this he resolves to search, and bring back the certainty to his comrades.
The Aeneid By Virgil
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15  She then exultingly filled the countries with manifold talk, and blazoned alike what was done and undone: one Aeneas is come, born of Trojan blood; on him beautiful Dido thinks no shame to fling herself; now they hold their winter, long-drawn through mutual caresses, regardless of their realms and enthralled by passionate dishonour.
The Aeneid By Virgil
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16  Seeing them close-ranked and daring for battle, I therewith began thus: "Men, hearts of supreme and useless bravery, if your desire be fixed to follow one who dares the utmost; you see what is the fortune of our state: all the gods by whom this empire was upheld have gone forth, abandoning shrine and altar; your aid comes to a burning city."
The Aeneid By Virgil
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17  Long-haired Iopas on his gilded lyre fills the chamber with songs ancient Atlas taught; he sings of the wandering moon and the sun's travails; whence is the human race and the brute, whence water and fire; of Arcturus, the rainy Hyades, and the twin Oxen; why wintry suns make such haste to dip in ocean, or what delay makes the nights drag lingeringly.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK FIRST
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