WHICH in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte
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 Current Search - which in Jane Eyre
1  Also I had drawn parallels in silence, which I never thought thus to have declared aloud.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER I
2  I closed the book, which I dared no longer peruse, and put it on the table, beside the untasted tart.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER III
3  ; which interest she exacted every quarter, keeping her accounts in a little book with anxious accuracy.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
4  He gorged himself habitually at table, which made him bilious, and gave him a dim and bleared eye and flabby cheeks.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER I
5  I caught scraps of their conversation, from which I was able only too distinctly to infer the main subject discussed.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER III
6  In my hand I held the tract containing the sudden death of the Liar, to which narrative my attention had been pointed as to an appropriate warning.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
7  It tarried, however: days and weeks passed: I had regained my normal state of health, but no new allusion was made to the subject over which I brooded.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
8  No severe or prolonged bodily illness followed this incident of the red-room; it only gave my nerves a shock of which I feel the reverberation to this day.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER III
9  I resisted all the way: a new thing for me, and a circumstance which greatly strengthened the bad opinion Bessie and Miss Abbot were disposed to entertain of me.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER II
10  I say scarcely voluntary, for it seemed as if my tongue pronounced words without my will consenting to their utterance: something spoke out of me over which I had no control.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
11  Georgiana sat on a high stool, dressing her hair at the glass, and interweaving her curls with artificial flowers and faded feathers, of which she had found a store in a drawer in the attic.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
12  I was about to propound a question, touching the manner in which that operation of changing my heart was to be performed, when Mrs. Reed interposed, telling me to sit down; she then proceeded to carry on the conversation herself.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
13  I felt physically weak and broken down: but my worse ailment was an unutterable wretchedness of mind: a wretchedness which kept drawing from me silent tears; no sooner had I wiped one salt drop from my cheek than another followed.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER III
14  All this being nothing to me, my vacant attention soon found livelier attraction in the spectacle of a little hungry robin, which came and chirruped on the twigs of the leafless cherry-tree nailed against the wall near the casement.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
15  My heart beat thick, my head grew hot; a sound filled my ears, which I deemed the rushing of wings; something seemed near me; I was oppressed, suffocated: endurance broke down; I rushed to the door and shook the lock in desperate effort.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER II
16  I covered my head and arms with the skirt of my frock, and went out to walk in a part of the plantation which was quite sequestrated; but I found no pleasure in the silent trees, the falling fir-cones, the congealed relics of autumn, russet leaves, swept by past winds in heaps, and now stiffened together.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
17  My seat, to which Bessie and the bitter Miss Abbot had left me riveted, was a low ottoman near the marble chimney-piece; the bed rose before me; to my right hand there was the high, dark wardrobe, with subdued, broken reflections varying the gloss of its panels; to my left were the muffled windows; a great looking-glass between them repeated the vacant majesty of the bed and room.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER II
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