WHICH in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Moby Dick by Herman Melville
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 Current Search - which in Moby Dick
1  Abominable are the tumblers into which he pours his poison.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. The Spouter-Inn.
2  But presently I came to a smoky light proceeding from a low, wide building, the door of which stood invitingly open.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2. The Carpet-Bag.
3  Its extreme downtown is the battery, where that noble mole is washed by waves, and cooled by breezes, which a few hours previous were out of sight of land.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1. Loomings.
4  My arm hung over the counterpane, and the nameless, unimaginable, silent form or phantom, to which the hand belonged, seemed closely seated by my bed-side.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4. The Counterpane.
5  So omnipotent is art; which in many a district of New Bedford has superinduced bright terraces of flowers upon the barren refuse rocks thrown aside at creation's final day.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 6. The Street.
6  But seeing that it was not at all limber, and that it glistened a good deal like polished ebony, I concluded that it must be nothing but a wooden idol, which indeed it proved to be.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. The Spouter-Inn.
7  For my mind was made up to sail in no other than a Nantucket craft, because there was a fine, boisterous something about everything connected with that famous old island, which amazingly pleased me.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2. The Carpet-Bag.
8  Now, take away the awful fear, and my sensations at feeling the supernatural hand in mine were very similar, in their strangeness, to those which I experienced on waking up and seeing Queequeg's pagan arm thrown round me.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4. The Counterpane.
9  Between the marble cenotaphs on either hand of the pulpit, the wall which formed its back was adorned with a large painting representing a gallant ship beating against a terrible storm off a lee coast of black rocks and snowy breakers.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 8. The Pulpit.
10  All these strange antics were accompanied by still stranger guttural noises from the devotee, who seemed to be praying in a sing-song or else singing some pagan psalmody or other, during which his face twitched about in the most unnatural manner.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. The Spouter-Inn.
11  But, besides the Feegeeans, Tongatobooarrs, Erromanggoans, Pannangians, and Brighggians, and, besides the wild specimens of the whaling-craft which unheeded reel about the streets, you will see other sights still more curious, certainly more comical.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 6. The Street.
12  Going to his heavy grego, or wrapall, or dreadnaught, which he had previously hung on a chair, he fumbled in the pockets, and produced at length a curious little deformed image with a hunch on its back, and exactly the colour of a three days' old Congo baby.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. The Spouter-Inn.
13  The wife of a whaling captain had provided the chapel with a handsome pair of red worsted man-ropes for this ladder, which, being itself nicely headed, and stained with a mahogany colour, the whole contrivance, considering what manner of chapel it was, seemed by no means in bad taste.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 8. The Pulpit.
14  All these queer proceedings increased my uncomfortableness, and seeing him now exhibiting strong symptoms of concluding his business operations, and jumping into bed with me, I thought it was high time, now or never, before the light was put out, to break the spell in which I had so long been bound.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. The Spouter-Inn.
15  One complained of a bad cold in his head, upon which Jonah mixed him a pitch-like potion of gin and molasses, which he swore was a sovereign cure for all colds and catarrhs whatsoever, never mind of how long standing, or whether caught off the coast of Labrador, or on the weather side of an ice-island.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. The Spouter-Inn.
16  But high above the flying scud and dark-rolling clouds, there floated a little isle of sunlight, from which beamed forth an angel's face; and this bright face shed a distinct spot of radiance upon the ship's tossed deck, something like that silver plate now inserted into the Victory's plank where Nelson fell.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 8. The Pulpit.
17  On one side hung a very large oilpainting so thoroughly besmoked, and every way defaced, that in the unequal crosslights by which you viewed it, it was only by diligent study and a series of systematic visits to it, and careful inquiry of the neighbors, that you could any way arrive at an understanding of its purpose.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. The Spouter-Inn.
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