WHICH in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde
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 Current Search - which in The Picture of Dorian Gray
1  The generation into which I was born was tedious.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3
2  You have only a few years in which to live really, perfectly, and fully.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
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3  Sometimes this was the effect of art, and chiefly of the art of literature, which dealt immediately with the passions and the intellect.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
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4  In politics he was a Tory, except when the Tories were in office, during which period he roundly abused them for being a pack of Radicals.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3
5  The terror of society, which is the basis of morals, the terror of God, which is the secret of religion--these are the two things that govern us.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2
6  Because, without intending it, I have put into it some expression of all this curious artistic idolatry, of which, of course, I have never cared to speak to him.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1
7  We degenerate into hideous puppets, haunted by the memory of the passions of which we were too much afraid, and the exquisite temptations that we had not the courage to yield to.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2
8  I believe some picture of mine had made a great success at the time, at least had been chattered about in the penny newspapers, which is the nineteenth-century standard of immortality.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
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9  But he suddenly started up, and closing his eyes, placed his fingers upon the lids, as though he sought to imprison within his brain some curious dream from which he feared he might awake.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
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10  Her white feet trod the huge press at which wise Omar sits, till the seething grape-juice rose round her bare limbs in waves of purple bubbles, or crawled in red foam over the vat's black, dripping, sloping sides.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
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11  Whenever I have gone there, there have been either so many people that I have not been able to see the pictures, which was dreadful, or so many pictures that I have not been able to see the people, which was worse.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
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12  It was clear to him that the experimental method was the only method by which one could arrive at any scientific analysis of the passions; and certainly Dorian Gray was a subject made to his hand, and seemed to promise rich and fruitful results.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4
13  I remember her bringing me up to a truculent and red-faced old gentleman covered all over with orders and ribbons, and hissing into my ear, in a tragic whisper which must have been perfectly audible to everybody in the room, the most astounding details.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
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14  He was amazed at the sudden impression that his words had produced, and, remembering a book that he had read when he was sixteen, a book which had revealed to him much that he had not known before, he wondered whether Dorian Gray was passing through a similar experience.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
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15  He watched it with that strange interest in trivial things that we try to develop when things of high import make us afraid, or when we are stirred by some new emotion for which we cannot find expression, or when some thought that terrifies us lays sudden siege to the brain and calls on us to yield.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2
16  Fortunately for him she had on the other side Lord Faudel, a most intelligent middle-aged mediocrity, as bald as a ministerial statement in the House of Commons, with whom she was conversing in that intensely earnest manner which is the one unpardonable error, as he remarked once himself, that all really good people fall into, and from which none of them ever quite escape.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
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17  His father had been our ambassador at Madrid when Isabella was young and Prim unthought of, but had retired from the diplomatic service in a capricious moment of annoyance on not being offered the Embassy at Paris, a post to which he considered that he was fully entitled by reason of his birth, his indolence, the good English of his dispatches, and his inordinate passion for pleasure.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3
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