WHIP in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from The Narrative of the Life by Frederick Douglass
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 Current Search - whip in The Narrative of the Life
1  Mr. Jepson's slaves would boast his ability to whip Colonel Lloyd.
The Narrative of the Life By Frederick Douglass
Get Context   In CHAPTER III
2  He always managed to have one or more of his slaves to whip every Monday morning.
The Narrative of the Life By Frederick Douglass
Get Context   In CHAPTER X
3  Mr. Gore once undertook to whip one of Colonel Lloyd's slaves, by the name of Demby.
The Narrative of the Life By Frederick Douglass
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
4  His plan was to whip for the smallest offences, to prevent the commission of large ones.
The Narrative of the Life By Frederick Douglass
Get Context   In CHAPTER X
5  He would then come out fresh in the evening, ready to urge us on with his words, example, and frequently with the whip.
The Narrative of the Life By Frederick Douglass
Get Context   In CHAPTER X
6  His maxim was, Behave well or behave ill, it is the duty of a master occasionally to whip a slave, to remind him of his master's authority.
The Narrative of the Life By Frederick Douglass
Get Context   In CHAPTER X
7  He would whip her to make her scream, and whip her to make her hush; and not until overcome by fatigue, would he cease to swing the blood-clotted cowskin.
The Narrative of the Life By Frederick Douglass
Get Context   In CHAPTER I
8  It would astonish one, unaccustomed to a slaveholding life, to see with what wonderful ease a slaveholder can find things, of which to make occasion to whip a slave.
The Narrative of the Life By Frederick Douglass
Get Context   In CHAPTER X
9  I have seen him whip a woman, causing the blood to run half an hour at the time; and this, too, in the midst of her crying children, pleading for their mother's release.
The Narrative of the Life By Frederick Douglass
Get Context   In CHAPTER II
10  I have known him to cut and slash the women's heads so horribly, that even master would be enraged at his cruelty, and would threaten to whip him if he did not mind himself.
The Narrative of the Life By Frederick Douglass
Get Context   In CHAPTER I
11  I have seen Winder make one of the house-servants stand off from him a suitable distance to be touched with the end of his whip, and at every stroke raise great ridges upon his back.
The Narrative of the Life By Frederick Douglass
Get Context   In CHAPTER III
12  He spoke but to command, and commanded but to be obeyed; he dealt sparingly with his words, and bountifully with his whip, never using the former where the latter would answer as well.
The Narrative of the Life By Frederick Douglass
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
13  His master, in many cases, goes off to town, and buys a large quantity; he returns, takes his whip, and commands the slave to eat the molasses, until the poor fellow is made sick at the very mention of it.
The Narrative of the Life By Frederick Douglass
Get Context   In CHAPTER X
14  I have often been awakened at the dawn of day by the most heart-rending shrieks of an own aunt of mine, whom he used to tie up to a joist, and whip upon her naked back till she was literally covered with blood.
The Narrative of the Life By Frederick Douglass
Get Context   In CHAPTER I
15  I have known him to tie her up early in the morning, and whip her before breakfast; leave her, go to his store, return at dinner, and whip her again, cutting her in the places already made raw with his cruel lash.
The Narrative of the Life By Frederick Douglass
Get Context   In CHAPTER IX
16  Mr. Severe, the overseer, used to stand by the door of the quarter, armed with a large hickory stick and heavy cowskin, ready to whip any one who was so unfortunate as not to hear, or, from any other cause, was prevented from being ready to start for the field at the sound of the horn.
The Narrative of the Life By Frederick Douglass
Get Context   In CHAPTER II
17  He told me, with great solemnity, I must go back to Covey; but that before I went, I must go with him into another part of the woods, where there was a certain root, which, if I would take some of it with me, carrying it always on my right side, would render it impossible for Mr. Covey, or any other white man, to whip me.
The Narrative of the Life By Frederick Douglass
Get Context   In CHAPTER X
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