WIND in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte
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 Current Search - wind in Wuthering Heights
1  I appeared to feel the warm breath of it displacing the sleet-laden wind.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXIX
2  We were in the middle of winter, the wind blew strong from the north-east, and I objected.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XII
3  A book lay spread on the sill before her, and the scarcely perceptible wind fluttered its leaves at intervals.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XV
4  She went sadly on: there was no running or bounding now, though the chill wind might well have tempted her to race.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXII
5  In the evening the weather broke: the wind shifted from south to north-east, and brought rain first, and then sleet and snow.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVII
6  However, I went, through wind and rain, and brought one, the doctor, back with me; the other said he would come in the morning.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER V
7  A sorrowful sight I saw: dark night coming down prematurely, and sky and hills mingled in one bitter whirl of wind and suffocating snow.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER II
8  In passing the garden to reach the road, at a place where a bridle hook is driven into the wall, I saw something white moved irregularly, evidently by another agent than the wind.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XII
9  There was no sound through the house but the moaning wind, which shook the windows every now and then, the faint crackling of the coals, and the click of my snuffers as I removed at intervals the long wick of the candle.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVII
10  On one side of the road rose a high, rough bank, where hazels and stunted oaks, with their roots half exposed, held uncertain tenure: the soil was too loose for the latter; and strong winds had blown some nearly horizontal.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXII
11  I lingered round them, under that benign sky: watched the moths fluttering among the heath and harebells, listened to the soft wind breathing through the grass, and wondered how any one could ever imagine unquiet slumbers for the sleepers in that quiet earth.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXIV
12  There was a violent wind, as well as thunder, and either one or the other split a tree off at the corner of the building: a huge bough fell across the roof, and knocked down a portion of the east chimney-stack, sending a clatter of stones and soot into the kitchen-fire.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER IX
13  Pure, bracing ventilation they must have up there at all times, indeed: one may guess the power of the north wind blowing over the edge, by the excessive slant of a few stunted firs at the end of the house; and by a range of gaunt thorns all stretching their limbs one way, as if craving alms of the sun.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER I
14  This time, I remembered I was lying in the oak closet, and I heard distinctly the gusty wind, and the driving of the snow; I heard, also, the fir bough repeat its teasing sound, and ascribed it to the right cause: but it annoyed me so much, that I resolved to silence it, if possible; and, I thought, I rose and endeavoured to unhasp the casement.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER III
15  Happily, an inhabitant of the kitchen made more despatch: a lusty dame, with tucked-up gown, bare arms, and fire-flushed cheeks, rushed into the midst of us flourishing a frying-pan: and used that weapon, and her tongue, to such purpose, that the storm subsided magically, and she only remained, heaving like a sea after a high wind, when her master entered on the scene.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER I