WOMAN in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Hard Times by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - woman in Hard Times
1  And yet this old woman would NEVER be quiet.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V
2  There was no mute sign of a woman in the room.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER II
3  He certainly never had seen this old woman before.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XII
4  The strange old woman was delighted with the very bell.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XII
5  It was not a face in its first bloom; she was a woman five and thirty years of age.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER X
6  An old woman who seems to have been flying into town on a broomstick, every now and then.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VII
7  Then the curtain moved more perceptibly, and the woman in the bed put it back, and sat up.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XIII
8  On his telling her where he worked, the old woman became a more singular old woman than before.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XII
9  As he recoiled, looking down at it, it raised itself up into the form of a woman in a sitting attitude.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER X
10  She was a child now, of fifteen or sixteen; but at no distant day would seem to become a woman all at once.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER III
11  Yet there was a vague remembrance in his mind, as if he had more than once dreamed of some old woman like her.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XII
12  It was an old woman, tall and shapely still, though withered by time, on whom his eyes fell when he stopped and turned.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XII
13  Then I became a young vagabond; and instead of one old woman knocking me about and starving me, everybody of all ages knocked me about and starved me.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER IV
14  Once again, Stephen had to conquer an instinctive propensity to dislike this old woman, though her manner was as honest and simple as a manner possibly could be.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VI
15  He knew that there was trouble enough in the world; and if the old woman had lived so long, and could count upon his having so little, why so much the better for her, and none the worse for him.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XII
16  The old woman was so decent and contented, and made so light of her infirmities, though they had increased upon her since her former interview with Stephen, that they both took an interest in her.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VI
17  He thought of the waste of the best part of his life, of the change it made in his character for the worse every day, of the dreadful nature of his existence, bound hand and foot, to a dead woman, and tormented by a demon in her shape.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XII
18  It seemed as if, first in her own fire within the house, and then in the fiery haze without, she tried to discover what kind of woof Old Time, that greatest and longest-established Spinner of all, would weave from the threads he had already spun into a woman.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XIV
19  He had been at his loom full half an hour, thinking about this old woman, when, having occasion to move round the loom for its adjustment, he glanced through a window which was in his corner, and saw her still looking up at the pile of building, lost in admiration.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XII
20  The flutter of her manner, in the unwonted noise of the streets; the spare shawl, carried unfolded on her arm; the heavy umbrella, and little basket; the loose long-fingered gloves, to which her hands were unused; all bespoke an old woman from the country, in her plain holiday clothes, come into Coketown on an expedition of rare occurrence.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XII