WOOD in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte
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 Current Search - wood in Jane Eyre
1  We entered the wood, and wended homeward.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXVII
2  At last the woods rose; the rookery clustered dark; a loud cawing broke the morning stillness.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXVI
3  Ferndean is buried, as you see, in a heavy wood, where sound falls dull, and dies unreverberating.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXVII
4  I could not hope to get a lodging under a roof, and sought it in the wood I have before alluded to.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXVIII
5  Entering a portal, fastened only by a latch, I stood amidst a space of enclosed ground, from which the wood swept away in a semicircle.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXVII
6  The manor-house of Ferndean was a building of considerable antiquity, moderate size, and no architectural pretensions, deep buried in a wood.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXVII
7  I hear a nightingale warbling in a wood half a mile off; no moving form is visible, no coming step audible; but that perfume increases: I must flee.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXIII
8  Even when within a very short distance of the manor-house, you could see nothing of it, so thick and dark grew the timber of the gloomy wood about it.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXVII
9  The wind fell, for a second, round Thornfield; but far away over wood and water, poured a wild, melancholy wail: it was sad to listen to, and I ran off again.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXV
10  From my seat I could look down on Thornfield: the grey and battlemented hall was the principal object in the vale below me; its woods and dark rookery rose against the west.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XII
11  I led him out of the wet and wild wood into some cheerful fields: I described to him how brilliantly green they were; how the flowers and hedges looked refreshed; how sparklingly blue was the sky.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXVII
12  All the valley at my right hand was full of pasture-fields, and cornfields, and wood; and a glittering stream ran zig-zag through the varied shades of green, the mellowing grain, the sombre woodland, the clear and sunny lea.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXVIII
13  But I, and the rest who continued well, enjoyed fully the beauties of the scene and season; they let us ramble in the wood, like gipsies, from morning till night; we did what we liked, went where we liked: we lived better too.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER IX
14  The hay was all got in; the fields round Thornfield were green and shorn; the roads white and baked; the trees were in their dark prime; hedge and wood, full-leaved and deeply tinted, contrasted well with the sunny hue of the cleared meadows between.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXIII
15  One evening, in the beginning of June, I had stayed out very late with Mary Ann in the wood; we had, as usual, separated ourselves from the others, and had wandered far; so far that we lost our way, and had to ask it at a lonely cottage, where a man and woman lived, who looked after a herd of half-wild swine that fed on the mast in the wood.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER IX
16  Besides, there were fewer to feed; the sick could eat little; our breakfast-basins were better filled; when there was no time to prepare a regular dinner, which often happened, she would give us a large piece of cold pie, or a thick slice of bread and cheese, and this we carried away with us to the wood, where we each chose the spot we liked best, and dined sumptuously.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER IX
17  The afternoon came on wet and somewhat misty: as it waned into dusk, I began to feel that we were getting very far indeed from Gateshead: we ceased to pass through towns; the country changed; great grey hills heaved up round the horizon: as twilight deepened, we descended a valley, dark with wood, and long after night had overclouded the prospect, I heard a wild wind rushing amongst trees.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER V
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