WORK in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Les Misérables (V3) by Victor Hugo
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 Current Search - work in Les Misérables (V3)
1  The work was clumsy, the worker cross.
Les Misérables (V3) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER VII—SOME PETTICOAT
2  You'll see how well the whole thing will work.
Les Misérables (V3) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 8: CHAPTER XII—THE USE MADE OF M. LEBLANC'S FIVE-FRANC PIECE
3  Their faces are black because they work in charcoal.
Les Misérables (V3) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 8: CHAPTER XIX—OCCUPYING ONE'S SELF WITH OBSCURE DEPTHS
4  The work there effected, taken as a whole has a name: Progress.
Les Misérables (V3) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 7: CHAPTER II—THE LOWEST DEPTHS
5  His muscles called for work, his stupidity would have none of it.
Les Misérables (V3) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 7: CHAPTER III—BABET, GUEULEMER, CLAQUESOUS, AND ...
6  The embryonic work of the future is one of the visions of philosophy.
Les Misérables (V3) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 7: CHAPTER I—MINES AND MINERS
7  To open it, to scale the frame, to bestride it, was the work of a second only.
Les Misérables (V3) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 8: CHAPTER XX—THE TRAP
8  It is in a little work entitled Claude Gueux that this word made its appearance.
Les Misérables (V3) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER VII—THE GAMIN SHOULD HAVE HIS PLACE IN THE ...
9  The tumultuous movements of these minds at liberty and at work set his ideas in a whirl.
Les Misérables (V3) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 4: CHAPTER III—MARIUS' ASTONISHMENTS
10  Moreover, no trace of work was revealed in that dwelling; no handicraft, no spinning-wheel, not a tool.
Les Misérables (V3) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 8: CHAPTER VI—THE WILD MAN IN HIS LAIR
11  By dint of toil, perseverance, courage, and will, he had managed to draw from his work about seven hundred francs a year.
Les Misérables (V3) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 5: CHAPTER II—MARIUS POOR
12  As he owned nothing, he never locked his door, unless occasionally, though very rarely, when he was engaged in some pressing work.
Les Misérables (V3) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 8: CHAPTER III—QUADRIFRONS
13  This great affair was being discussed in a low voice, and the two heads at work touched each other: "Let us begin by finding names."
Les Misérables (V3) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 4: CHAPTER IV—THE BACK ROOM OF THE CAFE MUSAIN
14  About seven o'clock in the morning, he had just risen and breakfasted, and was trying to settle down to work, when there came a soft knock at his door.
Les Misérables (V3) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 8: CHAPTER III—QUADRIFRONS
15  He had composed and published a Flora of the Environs of Cauteretz, with colored plates, a work which enjoyed a tolerable measure of esteem and which sold well.
Les Misérables (V3) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 5: CHAPTER IV—M. MABEUF
16  The work is good, up to a degree which the social philosophies are able to recognize; beyond that degree it is doubtful and mixed; lower down, it becomes terrible.
Les Misérables (V3) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 7: CHAPTER I—MINES AND MINERS
17  This appellation, Patron-Minette, was probably derived from the hour at which their work ended, the dawn being the vanishing moment for phantoms and for the separation of ruffians.
Les Misérables (V3) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 7: CHAPTER IV—COMPOSITION OF THE TROUPE
18  He is firm serene, gentle, peaceful, attentive, serious, content with little, kindly; and he thanks God for having bestowed on him those two forms of riches which many a rich man lacks: work, which makes him free; and thought, which makes him dignified.
Les Misérables (V3) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 5: CHAPTER III—MARIUS GROWN UP
19  These men, through the black masks or paste which covered their faces, and made of them, at fear's pleasure, charcoal-burners, negroes, or demons, had a stupid and gloomy air, and it could be felt that they perpetrated a crime like a bit of work, tranquilly, without either wrath or mercy, with a sort of ennui.
Les Misérables (V3) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 8: CHAPTER XX—THE TRAP
20  From the day when he had succeeded in earning his living with some approach to certainty, he had stopped, thinking it good to be poor, and retrenching time from his work to give to thought; that is to say, he sometimes passed entire days in meditation, absorbed, engulfed, like a visionary, in the mute voluptuousness of ecstasy and inward radiance.
Les Misérables (V3) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 5: CHAPTER III—MARIUS GROWN UP