ARISTOCRACY's Sentences and Contexts

Learn ARISTOCRACY from sentences of classic books. The app collects 10,000 middle or hard words; input your word, you not only get its meaning and example, but also have sentences and their contexts from classic literatures.

 Sentences of aristocracy
Definition:
n. hereditary nobility; privileged class
Example:
Americans have mixed feelings about hereditary aristocracy.
Sentence in Classic:
The rôle he had taken up, the rôle of a wealthy landowner, one of that class which ought to be the very heart of the Russian aristocracy, was entirely to his taste; and now, after spending six months in that character, he derived even greater satisfaction from it.
Anna Karenina(V2) By Leo Tolstoy Context
For where we have a monarchy, an aristocracy, and a democracy existing together in the same city, each of the three serves as a check upon the other.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli Context
I wish only to tell you that aristocracy is a principle, and in our days none but immoral or silly people can live without principles.
Fathers and Children By Ivan Sergeevich Turgenev Context
Coastal Georgia was too firmly held by an entrenched aristocracy for him ever to hope to win the place he intended to have.
Gone With The Wind By Margaret Mitche Context
One of the false ideas of the bourgeoisie under the Restoration as regards aristocracy and the nobility was to believe in the particle.
Les Misérables (V3) By Victor Hugo Context
Venice, as a people, will live again; England, the aristocracy, will fall, but England, the nation, is immortal.
Les Misérables (V4) By Victor Hugo Context
The aristocracy of Gopher Prairie, even the wives of the rival doctors, took part, and for several days there was community spirit and much uplift.
Main Street By Sinclair Lewis Context
He had recognized by certain unmistakable signs, that his fair incognita belonged to the aristocracy.
The Count of Monte Cristo By Alexandre Dumas Context
But the increasing civilization of the Negro since then has naturally meant the development of higher classes: there are increasing numbers of ministers, teachers, physicians, merchants, mechanics, and independent farmers, who by nature and training are the aristocracy and leaders of the blacks.
The Souls of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois Context
If all the broad land between the Mississippi and the Pacific becomes one great market for bodies and souls, and human property retains the locomotive tendencies of this nineteenth century, the trader and catcher may yet be among our aristocracy.
Uncle Tom's Cabin By Harriet Beecher Stowe Context