ASPIRING's Sentences and Contexts

Learn ASPIRING from sentences of classic books. The app collects 10,000 middle or hard words; input your word, you not only get its meaning and example, but also have sentences and their contexts from classic literatures.

 Sentences of aspiring
Definition:
a. ambitious; enthusiastic
Example:
Great to see another aspiring enthusiastic talent introduces them at forum!
Sentence in Classic:
Hanno, the foremost citizen of Carthage, aspiring to absolute power, on the occasion of the marriage of a daughter contrived a plot for administering poison to the whole senate and so making himself prince.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli Context
He recalled her memory with ardent, tender love, and hopeful aspiring to the better world; where he doubted not she was gone.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte Context
It was to teach them, that the holiest amongst us has but attained so far above his fellows as to discern more clearly the Mercy which looks down, and repudiate more utterly the phantom of human merit, which would look aspiringly upward.
The Scarlet Letter By Nathaniel Hawthorne Context
When he reported these dialogues he aspirated the first letter of his name after the manner of Florentines.
Dubliners By James Joyce Context
Being assisted by a gentleman who not long ago aspired to the favour of your hand, I am sanguine as to that.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens Context
Had I approached my discovery in a more noble spirit, had I risked the experiment while under the empire of generous or pious aspirations, all must have been otherwise, and from these agonies of death and birth, I had come forth an angel instead of a fiend.
Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde By Robert Louis Stevenson Context
She did not wish to see him again, not because she feared his influence, but because his presence always had the effect of cheapening her aspirations, of throwing her whole world out of focus.
House of Mirth By Edith Wharton Context
Learn from me, if not by my precepts, at least by my example, how dangerous is the acquirement of knowledge and how much happier that man is who believes his native town to be the world, than he who aspires to become greater than his nature will allow.
Frankenstein By Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley Context