CONCEIT's Sentences and Contexts

Learn CONCEIT from sentences of classic books. The app collects 10,000 middle or hard words; input your word, you not only get its meaning and example, but also have sentences and their contexts from classic literatures.

 Sentences of conceit
Definition:
n. overly high self-esteem; feelings of excessive pride
Example:
Although Jack was smug and puffed up with conceit, he was an entertaining companion, always expressing himself in witty turns of phrase.
Sentence in Classic:
And now, when one wants to smooth the thing over, some conceit prevents your apologizing, and you wish to make the whole affair public.
War and Peace(V1) By Leo Tolstoy Context
She seemed to think she had quite settled the question, and gave me such a triumphant little kiss, direct from her innocent heart, that I would hardly have put her out of conceit with her answer, for a fortune.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens Context
You have a good many little gifts and virtues, but there is no need of parading them, for conceit spoils the finest genius.
Little Women By Louisa May Alcott Context
And, if I may mention so delicate a subject, endeavour to check that little something, bordering on conceit and impertinence, which your lady possesses.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen Context
But while she wondered at the difference of the two young men, she did not find that the emptiness of conceit of the one, put her out of all charity with the modesty and worth of the other.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen Context
Nor, credulous as such minds must have been, was this conceit altogether without some faint show of superstitious probability.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville Context
To have lost the godlike conceit that we may do what we will, and not to have acquired a homely zest for doing what we can, shows a grandeur of temper which cannot be objected to in the abstract, for it denotes a mind that, though disappointed, forswears compromise.
Return of the Native By Thomas Hardy Context
The scout looked behind him, laughing at his own conceit, while he clambered up the partition, imitating, as he went, the clumsy motions of the beast he represented; but the instant the summit was gained he made a gesture for silence, and slid down with the utmost precipitation.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper Context