FIDGET's Sentences and Contexts

Learn FIDGET from sentences of classic books. The app collects 10,000 middle or hard words; input your word, you not only get its meaning and example, but also have sentences and their contexts from classic literatures.

 Sentences of fidget
Definition:
v. move uneasily one way and the other; behave or move nervously or restlessly
Example:
The children always fidget in their seats.
Sentence in Classic:
She began at length to recover, to fidget about in her chair, get up, sit down again, wonder, and bless herself.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen Context
From under this great panoply she peeped up in a nervous, hesitating fashion at our windows, while her body oscillated backward and forward, and her fingers fidgeted with her glove buttons.
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
I fidgeted up and down the raft, abusing myself to myself, and Jim was fidgeting up and down past me.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain Context
He fidgeted to and fro, swishing his long black tail against his sides and occasionally uttering a little whinny of surprise.
Animal Farm By George Orwell Context
At last I rose to go to bed, much to the relief of the sleepy waiter, who had got the fidgets in his legs, and was twisting them, and hitting them, and putting them through all kinds of contortions in his small pantry.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens Context
Beside him Honey Wilkes, so called because she indiscriminately addressed everyone from her father to the field hands by that endearment, fidgeted and giggled as she called greetings to the arriving guests.
Gone With The Wind By Margaret Mitche Context
On a slow afternoon when she fidgeted over sewing and wished that the telephone would ring, Bea announced Miss Vida Sherwin.
Main Street By Sinclair Lewis Context
The latter third of the speech was marred by the resumption of fights and other recreations among certain of the bad boys, and by fidgetings and whisperings that extended far and wide, washing even to the bases of isolated and incorruptible rocks like Sid and Mary.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain Context