GIDDY's Sentences and Contexts

Learn GIDDY from sentences of classic books. The app collects 10,000 middle or hard words; input your word, you not only get its meaning and example, but also have sentences and their contexts from classic literatures.

 Sentences of giddy
Definition:
a. lacking seriousness; dizzy; frivolous and lighthearted
a. lightheartedly silly, or joyfully elated; feeling dizzy or unsteady and as if about to fall down
Example:
The Democrats were still in giddy spirits during the convention and didn't take rivals seriously.
They fall in love; there’s a giddy scene at a sumptuous May Ball where they dance beneath the stars.
Sentence in Classic:
He felt himself on a pinnacle that made him giddy, and far away down below were all those nice excellent Karenins, Oblonskys, and all the world.
Anna Karenina(V2) By Leo Tolstoy Context
These thoughts, and a hundred other such thoughts, turned me burning hot, and made me giddy with apprehension and dismay.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens Context
These were the last words spoken by the whelp, before a giddy drowsiness came upon him, followed by complete oblivion.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens Context
Selma was a studious girl, who had not much tolerance for giddy things like Tiny and Lena; but they always spoke of her with admiration.
My Antonia By Willa Cather Context
An environment which would have made a contented woman a poet, a suffering woman a devotee, a pious woman a psalmist, even a giddy woman thoughtful, made a rebellious woman saturnine.
Return of the Native By Thomas Hardy Context
Suddenly he arose, lifted his hand to his brow as if his brain were giddy, paced twice or thrice round the dungeon, and then paused abruptly by the bed.
The Count of Monte Cristo By Alexandre Dumas Context
A form stood at the brow of the mountain, on the very edge of the giddy height, with uplifted arms, in an awful attitude of menace.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper Context
He was about to enlarge further, but the two youngsters broke into a noisy fit of merriment: my giddy miss being delighted to discover that she might turn his strange talk to matter of amusement.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte Context